INT11713

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Context Info
Confidence 0.76
First Reported 1988
Last Reported 2009
Negated 0
Speculated 0
Reported most in Body
Documents 22
Total Number 24
Disease Relevance 10.42
Pain Relevance 1.64

This is a graph with borders and nodes. Maybe there is an Imagemap used so the nodes may be linking to some Pages.

plasma membrane (RYR1) transmembrane transport (RYR1) cytoplasm (RYR1)
Anatomy Link Frequency
skeletal muscle 3
reticulum 3
muscle 2
brain 1
RYR1 (Homo sapiens)
Pain Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Calcium channel 9 98.70 Very High Very High Very High
agonist 4 96.24 Very High Very High Very High
Analgesic 2 95.36 Very High Very High Very High
Morphine 3 91.12 High High
anesthesia 50 89.40 High High
Action potential 1 89.08 High High
lidocaine 3 88.88 High High
Pain 10 86.00 High High
backache 2 84.48 Quite High
Spinal cord 1 80.76 Quite High
Disease Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Congenital Anomalies 8 99.74 Very High Very High Very High
Malignant Hyperthermia 393 99.64 Very High Very High Very High
Central Core Disease 80 99.36 Very High Very High Very High
Post-traumatic Stress Disorder 63 99.32 Very High Very High Very High
Chronic Disease 84 98.80 Very High Very High Very High
Mental Disorders 140 98.28 Very High Very High Very High
Syndrome 47 97.36 Very High Very High Very High
Stress 39 97.20 Very High Very High Very High
Death 9 95.04 Very High Very High Very High
Injury 56 94.20 High High

Sentences Mentioned In

Key: Protein Mutation Event Anatomy Negation Speculation Pain term Disease term
Together, these studies suggest that caffeine can enhance contractile force during submaximal contractions by potentiating calcium release from the ryanodine receptor, not by altering sarcoplasmic excitability.
Localization (release) of ryanodine receptor
1) Confidence 0.76 Published 2008 Journal Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquée, nutrition et métabolisme Section Abstract Doc Link 19088790 Disease Relevance 0.15 Pain Relevance 0.29
In this latter case, the likelihood of an RYR1 mutation resulting in both MH and CCD depends on a number of factors including sensitivity of mutant protein to agonists, size of the intracellular Ca2+ pool and the level of abnormality in channel-gating (reviewed in [19]).
Localization (resulting) of RYR1 associated with agonist, central core disease and malignant hyperthermia
2) Confidence 0.75 Published 2007 Journal Orphanet J Rare Dis Section Body Doc Link PMC1867813 Disease Relevance 1.67 Pain Relevance 0.05
Abnormalities in the Ca2+ release channel of skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum (the ryanodine receptor) have been implicated in the cause of both the porcine and human syndromes by physiological and biochemical studies and genetic linkage analysis.
Localization (release) of ryanodine receptor in reticulum associated with syndrome and congenital anomalies
3) Confidence 0.71 Published 1992 Journal Science Section Abstract Doc Link 1589759 Disease Relevance 0.88 Pain Relevance 0.09
To date, all mutations functionally characterized have been shown to cause alterations in calcium flux through the ryanodine receptor calcium release channel.
Localization (release) of ryanodine receptor
4) Confidence 0.70 Published 2007 Journal Orphanet J Rare Dis Section Body Doc Link PMC1867813 Disease Relevance 0.09 Pain Relevance 0
Susceptibility to MH results from mutations in calcium channel proteins that mediate excitation-contraction coupling, with the ryanodine receptor calcium release channel (RyR1) representing the major locus.
Localization (release) of RyR1 associated with calcium channel and malignant hyperthermia
5) Confidence 0.67 Published 2004 Journal Am J Forensic Med Pathol Section Abstract Doc Link 15577523 Disease Relevance 0.81 Pain Relevance 0.13
Susceptibility to MH results from mutations in calcium channel proteins that mediate excitation-contraction coupling, with the ryanodine receptor calcium release channel (RyR1) representing the major locus.
Localization (release) of ryanodine receptor associated with calcium channel and malignant hyperthermia
6) Confidence 0.67 Published 2004 Journal Am J Forensic Med Pathol Section Abstract Doc Link 15577523 Disease Relevance 0.81 Pain Relevance 0.13
To our knowledge, few studies have used electronic MHS records as an outcome of MHS utilization in combination with predisposing variables from both electronic medical records (EMRs) and self-reported questionnaires.
Localization (utilization) of MHS
7) Confidence 0.66 Published 2007 Journal BMC Public Health Section Body Doc Link PMC1949813 Disease Relevance 0.24 Pain Relevance 0
Another explanation for higher MHS utilization among individuals presenting chronic diseases is that they might be more likely to visit their general practitioner who diagnoses mental health problems and initiate treatment [11].
Localization (utilization) of MHS associated with mental disorders and chronic disease
8) Confidence 0.66 Published 2007 Journal BMC Public Health Section Body Doc Link PMC1949813 Disease Relevance 0.61 Pain Relevance 0
They showed that (subclinical) PTSD was clearly related to increased use of MHS.
Localization (use) of MHS associated with post-traumatic stress disorder
9) Confidence 0.66 Published 2007 Journal BMC Public Health Section Body Doc Link PMC1949813 Disease Relevance 0.50 Pain Relevance 0
Never reported before is our finding that survivors presenting physical health problems before the disaster are more likely to make use of MHS, even after controlling for confounders (table 6).
Localization (use) of MHS
10) Confidence 0.66 Published 2007 Journal BMC Public Health Section Body Doc Link PMC1949813 Disease Relevance 0.44 Pain Relevance 0
To our knowledge, few studies have used electronic MHS records as an outcome of MHS utilization in combination with predisposing variables from both electronic medical records (EMRs) and self-reported questionnaires.
Localization (utilization) of MHS
11) Confidence 0.66 Published 2007 Journal BMC Public Health Section Body Doc Link PMC1949813 Disease Relevance 0.23 Pain Relevance 0
For effective public health planning, it is essential to determine factors that predispose to MHS utilization.
Localization (utilization) of MHS
12) Confidence 0.66 Published 2007 Journal BMC Public Health Section Body Doc Link PMC1949813 Disease Relevance 0.64 Pain Relevance 0
The second, MHS(S), has the same constant release rate for 12 h.
Localization (release) of MHS
13) Confidence 0.64 Published 1988 Journal Br J Anaesth Section Abstract Doc Link 3415895 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.52
In multiple logistic models, adjusting for demographic and disaster related variables, MHS utilization was predicted by demographic variables (young age, immigrant, public health insurance, unemployment), disaster-related exposure (relocation and injuries), self-reported psychological problems and pre- and post-disaster physician diagnosed health problems (chronic diseases, musculoskeletal problems).
Localization (utilization) of MHS associated with injury and chronic disease
14) Confidence 0.62 Published 2007 Journal BMC Public Health Section Abstract Doc Link PMC1949813 Disease Relevance 0.65 Pain Relevance 0
In skeletal muscle, the rise in cytoplasmic Ca2+ is brought about by the opening of the ryanodine receptor (RyR1), which releases Ca2+ from intracellular stores [1],[2].
Localization (releases) of RyR1 in skeletal muscle
15) Confidence 0.51 Published 2009 Journal PLoS Computational Biology Section Body Doc Link PMC2668181 Disease Relevance 0.38 Pain Relevance 0
In skeletal muscle, the rise in cytoplasmic Ca2+ is brought about by the opening of the ryanodine receptor (RyR1), which releases Ca2+ from intracellular stores [1],[2].
Localization (releases) of ryanodine receptor in skeletal muscle
16) Confidence 0.51 Published 2009 Journal PLoS Computational Biology Section Body Doc Link PMC2668181 Disease Relevance 0.39 Pain Relevance 0
We also observe preferential localization of Ca2+ over K+ in the selectivity filter of RyR1.
Localization (localization) of RyR1
17) Confidence 0.44 Published 2009 Journal PLoS Computational Biology Section Abstract Doc Link PMC2668181 Disease Relevance 0.34 Pain Relevance 0
Sarcoplasmic calcium (Ca2+) release via the ryanodine receptor raises cytosolic Ca2+ and activates muscle contraction.
Localization (release) of ryanodine receptor in muscle
18) Confidence 0.23 Published 2005 Journal BMC Anesthesiol Section Body Doc Link PMC1175794 Disease Relevance 0.48 Pain Relevance 0.07
METHODS: The authors studied the effects of bupivacaine and the similarly lipid-soluble local anesthetic, tetracaine, on the Ca2+ release channel-ryanodine receptor of sarcoplasmic reticulum in swine skeletal and cardiac muscle. [3H]Ryanodine binding was used to measure the activity of the Ca2+ release channel-ryanodine receptors in microsomes of both muscles.
Localization (release) of channel-ryanodine receptor in muscles
19) Confidence 0.12 Published 1999 Journal Anesthesiology Section Body Doc Link 10078686 Disease Relevance 0.18 Pain Relevance 0
Thus, the pronounced myotoxicity of bupivacaine may be the result of this specific effect on Ca2+ release channel-ryanodine receptor superimposed on a nonspecific action on lipid bilayers to increase the Ca2+ permeability of sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes, an effect shared by all local anesthetics.
Localization (release) of channel-ryanodine receptor in reticulum
20) Confidence 0.12 Published 1999 Journal Anesthesiology Section Body Doc Link 10078686 Disease Relevance 0.05 Pain Relevance 0

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