INT136415

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Context Info
Confidence 0.70
First Reported 2006
Last Reported 2010
Negated 0
Speculated 0
Reported most in Body
Documents 6
Total Number 10
Disease Relevance 3.83
Pain Relevance 0.49

This is a graph with borders and nodes. Maybe there is an Imagemap used so the nodes may be linking to some Pages.

Anatomy Link Frequency
MC3 1
GHS (Homo sapiens)
Pain Link Frequency Relevance Heat
antagonist 98 99.80 Very High Very High Very High
monoamine 1 99.44 Very High Very High Very High
Somatostatin 50 99.36 Very High Very High Very High
Cannabinoid 11 98.72 Very High Very High Very High
Serotonin 1 98.36 Very High Very High Very High
Cholecystokinin 6 61.60 Quite High
Neuropeptide 17 55.52 Quite High
Opioid 1 51.76 Quite High
Pain 6 50.00 Quite Low
Inflammation 50 16.48 Low Low
Disease Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Obesity 81 99.84 Very High Very High Very High
Chronic Disease 5 99.70 Very High Very High Very High
Aging 114 99.00 Very High Very High Very High
Frailty 27 97.36 Very High Very High Very High
Weight Gain 18 95.44 Very High Very High Very High
Appetite Loss 71 93.96 High High
Shoulder Pain 1 90.76 High High
Body Weight 24 90.60 High High
Shoulder Dislocation 3 90.00 High High
Insulin Resistance 28 89.96 High High

Sentences Mentioned In

Key: Protein Mutation Event Anatomy Negation Speculation Pain term Disease term
A sample of 107 hemiplegic adults with recent stroke (less than 30 days from onset) was differentiated into two groups according to the presence of GHS.
Localization (presence) of GHS
1) Confidence 0.70 Published 2007 Journal Physiother Res Int Section Body Doc Link 17536647 Disease Relevance 0.18 Pain Relevance 0
The last observation is significant, because higher doses of ghrelin/GHS evoke ACTH, cortisol, and prolactin secretion acutely in humans and animals, putatively by inducing hypothalamic secretion of one or both primary ACTH-releasing peptides, corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), and arginine vasopressin (AVP) [272, 274–278].
Localization (secretion) of GHS
2) Confidence 0.31 Published 2010 Journal International Journal of Peptides Section Body Doc Link PMC2925380 Disease Relevance 0.21 Pain Relevance 0.03
Whereas both glucocorticoid deficiency and excess in chronic diseases can reduce GH response to GHS [4, 421], combined GHRH and ghrelin infusion is more effective at driving GH secretion than ghrelin alone [270]: Figure 8.
Localization (response) of GHS associated with chronic disease
3) Confidence 0.29 Published 2010 Journal International Journal of Peptides Section Body Doc Link PMC2925380 Disease Relevance 0.83 Pain Relevance 0
Congeneric molecules include GHRP-2, GHRP-6, hexarelin, ipamorelin, ibutamorelin, and the nonpeptide MK-0677, which like ghrelin rapidly induce inositol triphosphate, diacylglycerol, and Ca2+ release via the GHS-R1a [51, 63–67].

2.4.

Localization (release) of GHS
4) Confidence 0.29 Published 2010 Journal International Journal of Peptides Section Body Doc Link PMC2925380 Disease Relevance 0.42 Pain Relevance 0
Since highly selective GHS-R1a antagonists are not available for clinical investigation, determining the exact extent to which endogenous ghrelin participates in amplifying GH secretion in human physiology, including in utero, in infancy, childhood, puberty, adulthood, and senescence remains difficult [4, 65, 250].
Localization (selective) of GHS associated with aging and antagonist
5) Confidence 0.29 Published 2010 Journal International Journal of Peptides Section Body Doc Link PMC2925380 Disease Relevance 0.16 Pain Relevance 0.05
Likewise, why age and obesity impair GHS-induced secretion of GH but not of ACTH and prolactin is not known [113, 281].
Localization (secretion) of GHS associated with obesity
6) Confidence 0.24 Published 2010 Journal International Journal of Peptides Section Body Doc Link PMC2925380 Disease Relevance 0.21 Pain Relevance 0
Replacement of GH or stimulation of GH secretion with GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) or other GH secretagogues (GHS) would thus seem to be an appealing option to delay the onset of frailty in older adults and to prolong the capacity for independent living; but the balance of pros and cons is not necessarily the same as in AGHD.
Localization (secretagogues) of GHS associated with frailty
7) Confidence 0.11 Published 2008 Journal Clinical Interventions in Aging Section Body Doc Link PMC2544358 Disease Relevance 0.47 Pain Relevance 0
This review describes the components of the GH axis and their actions, compares and contrasts normal aging with AGHD; and summarizes GH replacement and the use of GHRH and GHS in these contexts.


Localization (use) of GHS associated with aging
8) Confidence 0.11 Published 2008 Journal Clinical Interventions in Aging Section Body Doc Link PMC2544358 Disease Relevance 0.43 Pain Relevance 0.03
Additionally, there are other substances which can enhance GH response to GHS by suppressing somatostatin secretion, including arginine and beta-adrenergic antagonists, which could potentially enhance treatment effects (Merriam et al 1997).
Localization (response) of GHS associated with antagonist and somatostatin
9) Confidence 0.11 Published 2008 Journal Clinical Interventions in Aging Section Body Doc Link PMC2544358 Disease Relevance 0.60 Pain Relevance 0.10
In six reviews, the melanocortins system (including MC4 and MC3 receptors, Agrp, MSH), the NPY receptors (including NPY-Y1, NPY-Y2, and NPY-Y5, PYY3-36), the cannabinoid system (including the development of rimonabant), the ghrelin (GHS, growth hormone secretagogue) system, the monoamine GPCRs (including serotonin, adrenergic and histamine receptors), orexin (hypocretin) system and the galanin receptors are covered.
Localization (secretagogue) of GHS in MC3 associated with cannabinoid, serotonin and monoamine
10) Confidence 0.06 Published 2006 Journal CNS Neurol Disord Drug Targets Section Abstract Doc Link 16787226 Disease Relevance 0.32 Pain Relevance 0.29

General Comments

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