INT18429

From wiki-pain
Jump to: navigation, search
Context Info
Confidence 0.31
First Reported 1990
Last Reported 2010
Negated 1
Speculated 1
Reported most in Abstract
Documents 8
Total Number 9
Disease Relevance 1.23
Pain Relevance 9.01

This is a graph with borders and nodes. Maybe there is an Imagemap used so the nodes may be linking to some Pages.

protein targeting (Hps4) cytoplasmic membrane-bounded vesicle (Hps4) lysosome (Hps4)
cytoplasm (Hps4)
Anatomy Link Frequency
visceral 1
plasma 1
pyramidal cells 1
spinal cord 1
ear 1
Hps4 (Mus musculus)
Pain Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Enkephalin 73 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
mu opioid receptor 44 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Dopamine 4 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Hippocampus 2 99.96 Very High Very High Very High
Opioid 2 99.20 Very High Very High Very High
opiate 4 98.40 Very High Very High Very High
Spinal cord 4 98.16 Very High Very High Very High
Dynorphin 10 98.08 Very High Very High Very High
opioid receptor 14 97.50 Very High Very High Very High
Analgesic 2 97.50 Very High Very High Very High
Disease Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Pressure And Volume Under Development 15 98.64 Very High Very High Very High
Arthritis 58 98.36 Very High Very High Very High
INFLAMMATION 37 94.64 High High
Diabetes Mellitus 1 59.56 Quite High
Hypersensitivity 4 58.96 Quite High
Disease 2 56.64 Quite High
Rheumatoid Arthritis 16 48.40 Quite Low
Adrenal Insufficiency 1 43.08 Quite Low
Bronchitis 1 41.72 Quite Low
Peptic Ulcer 1 41.24 Quite Low

Sentences Mentioned In

Key: Protein Mutation Event Anatomy Negation Speculation Pain term Disease term
In the CA3 region of the hippocampus, LE-LI was localized to large mossy fiber boutons (3-7 microns) that formed multiple asymmetric synapses on complex spiny dendritic processes and often formed puncta adherentia with the shafts of large CA3 pyramidal cell dendrites, indicating that this peptide may be directly released onto pyramidal cells.
Localization (localized) of LE in pyramidal cells associated with pyramidal cell, enkephalin and hippocampus
1) Confidence 0.31 Published 1995 Journal J. Comp. Neurol. Section Abstract Doc Link 7560290 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.93
Pretreatment with LE or rLE dose-dependently suppressed mouse ear edema induced with topical application of TPA for 4 hours, and rLE showed more potent inhibition of inflammation than LE, as shown in Figure 1.
Localization (dose) of rLE in ear associated with pressure and volume under development and inflammation
2) Confidence 0.10 Published 2010 Journal Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology Section Body Doc Link PMC2841253 Disease Relevance 1.23 Pain Relevance 0.36
In contrast, few (3%) MOR-ir profiles contacted LE-ir profiles; only 16% of these contacts included observable synapses, and very few profiles (0.5%) colocalized MOR and LE immunoreactivity.
Localization (colocalized) of LE in synapses associated with enkephalin
3) Confidence 0.07 Published 2002 Journal Exp. Neurol. Section Abstract Doc Link 12093103 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 1.53
These results suggest that activation of hilar MORs by LE usually involves short-range volume transmission and that dendritic MORs are as likely as axonal and terminal MORs to be activated by released LE.
Localization (released) of LE associated with mu opioid receptor and enkephalin
4) Confidence 0.06 Published 2002 Journal Exp. Neurol. Section Abstract Doc Link 12093103 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 1.33
To determine the cellular sites for the visceral effects of MOR ligands, including LE, we used immunogold-silver and immunoperoxidase methods for light and electron microscopic localization of antisera against MOR (carboxyl terminal domain) and LE in the caudal NTS of rat brain.
Localization (localization) of LE in visceral associated with mu opioid receptor and enkephalin
5) Confidence 0.02 Published 1996 Journal J. Comp. Neurol. Section Abstract Doc Link 8841907 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 1.04
To establish the cellular sites for the spinally mediated analgesic effects of MOR activation and the potential anatomical substrates for interactions with LE, we examined the ultrastructural localization of MOR and LE immunoreactivities in the adult rat cervical spinal cord (C3-C5).
Spec (examined) Localization (localization) of LE in spinal cord associated with analgesic, mu opioid receptor, enkephalin and spinal cord
6) Confidence 0.02 Published 1996 Journal Brain Res. Section Abstract Doc Link 8883864 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 1.51
We conclude that in the rat NAC, MOR is localized prominently to extrasynaptic neuronal and more rarely to glial plasma membranes that are readily accessible to released LE and possibly other opioid peptides and opiate drugs.
Localization (released) of LE in plasma associated with nucleus accumbens, opiate, enkephalin, opioid receptor and opioid
7) Confidence 0.02 Published 1996 Journal J. Neurosci. Section Abstract Doc Link 8753878 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 1.43
Immunoreactive LE, which is normally not found in CSF, increased rapidly in content following Dyn A-(1-8) infusion, an observation suggesting that the larger peptide is converted to LE.
Neg (not) Localization (found) of LE associated with dynorphin and enkephalin
8) Confidence 0.02 Published 1990 Journal J. Neurochem. Section Abstract Doc Link 1973455 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.79
We have previously shown that light-dependent dopamine release is impaired in this genotype and this could, in theory, explain the low amplitude of light adaptation in implicit time [32].
Localization (release) of light-dependent associated with dopamine
9) Confidence 0.01 Published 2009 Journal Molecular Vision Section Body Doc Link PMC2773742 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.09

General Comments

This test has worked.

Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox