INT19488

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Context Info
Confidence 0.69
First Reported 1991
Last Reported 2010
Negated 2
Speculated 1
Reported most in Abstract
Documents 56
Total Number 60
Disease Relevance 21.51
Pain Relevance 50.56

This is a graph with borders and nodes. Maybe there is an Imagemap used so the nodes may be linking to some Pages.

mitochondrion (ABAT)
Anatomy Link Frequency
neurons 6
spinal 3
soma 3
dendrites 2
hippocampus 2
ABAT (Homo sapiens)
Pain Link Frequency Relevance Heat
gABA 1015 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Dopamine 467 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Glutamate 352 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Neurotransmitter 93 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
agonist 168 99.96 Very High Very High Very High
Neuropeptide 7 99.92 Very High Very High Very High
nMDA receptor 158 99.80 Very High Very High Very High
antinociception 4 99.78 Very High Very High Very High
Hippocampus 163 99.68 Very High Very High Very High
pregabalin 161 99.68 Very High Very High Very High
Disease Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Generalized Anxiety Disorder 83 99.90 Very High Very High Very High
Stress 447 99.82 Very High Very High Very High
Injury 186 99.48 Very High Very High Very High
Ganglion Cysts 34 99.32 Very High Very High Very High
Nociception 12 98.88 Very High Very High Very High
Frailty 68 98.78 Very High Very High Very High
Neuropathic Pain 37 98.60 Very High Very High Very High
Lifespan 108 98.56 Very High Very High Very High
Scotoma 4 98.50 Very High Very High Very High
Depression 96 97.98 Very High Very High Very High

Sentences Mentioned In

Key: Protein Mutation Event Anatomy Negation Speculation Pain term Disease term
Preclinical trials have suggested that GABAergic compounds (i.e., compounds that promote GABA release or conservation) blunt the dopamine response to cocaine administration and conditioned reminders of prior cocaine use (Dewey et al., 1997) and reduce self-administration of cocaine in animal models (Kushner, Dewey, and Kornetsky, 1999).
Localization (release) of GABA associated with dopamine, gaba, gabaergic and cocaine
1) Confidence 0.69 Published 2008 Journal Addiction Science & Clinical Practice Section Body Doc Link PMC2797110 Disease Relevance 0.52 Pain Relevance 1.23
This study provides the first evidence that GABA is released in the human cerebral cortex during painful stimulation.
Localization (released) of GABA in cerebral cortex associated with pain, gaba and cerebral cortex
2) Confidence 0.69 Published 2009 Journal Pain Section Abstract Doc Link 19167811 Disease Relevance 0.23 Pain Relevance 1.61
For example, vigabatrin, a GABA agonist with good bioavailability and analgesic action, produced visual field defects in 1/3 of patients during therapy and tiagabine, a selective inhibitor of GABA transport (GAT1), took twenty years to bring to market.17,18
Localization (transport) of GABA associated with scotoma, gaba, analgesic, agonist and bioavailability
3) Confidence 0.67 Published 2010 Journal Perspect Medicin Chem Section Body Doc Link PMC2918363 Disease Relevance 0.72 Pain Relevance 1.21
Therefore, 5-HT via an action at 5-HT3 receptors may evoked release of GABA, which may in turn inhibit nociceptive transmission at a site postsynaptic to terminals of primary afferent fibers.
Localization (release) of GABA associated with nociception, gaba and primary afferent fibers
4) Confidence 0.62 Published 1991 Journal J. Neurosci. Section Abstract Doc Link 2066767 Disease Relevance 0.16 Pain Relevance 1.02
Spinal 5-HT3 receptor-mediated antinociception: possible release of GABA.
Localization (release) of GABA in Spinal associated with antinociception, gaba and nociceptor
5) Confidence 0.62 Published 1991 Journal J. Neurosci. Section Title Doc Link 2066767 Disease Relevance 0.08 Pain Relevance 0.98
Factors that diminish activity include short-term, frequency-dependent depression (frequencies < 1 Hz); feedback activation of type II metabotropic glutamate receptors; and the potential release of GABA, neuropeptide Y, adenosine, and dynorphin from recurrent mossy fiber boutons.
Localization (release) of GABA in boutons associated with adenocard, gaba, dynorphin, depression, glutamate receptor and neuropeptide
6) Confidence 0.62 Published 2003 Journal Neurochem. Res. Section Abstract Doc Link 14584819 Disease Relevance 0.66 Pain Relevance 0.43
1) Clinical reports of central pain relief after the administration of intrathecal baclofen, a GABA-B agonist.2–6 2) Clinical trials in which tricyclic antidepressant therapy produce analgesia presumably through reversal of GABA inhibition.7 3) Laboratory reports in animals in which application of GABA in the cerebral cortex produced analgesia and intrathecal GABA antagonists produced allodynia and hyperalgesia.8
Localization (application) of GABA in cerebral cortex associated with pain, central pain, allodynia, tricyclic antidepressant, analgesia, gaba, hyperalgesia, antagonist, agonist, cerebral cortex and intrathecal
7) Confidence 0.59 Published 2010 Journal Perspect Medicin Chem Section Body Doc Link PMC2918363 Disease Relevance 0.82 Pain Relevance 1.85
Double immunolabeling showed that GABA(A)Rs are localized on soma and dendrites of GABAergic neurons in the human neocortex.
Localization (localized) of GABA in soma associated with gaba and gabaergic
8) Confidence 0.53 Published 2009 Journal Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch. Pharmacol. Section Abstract Doc Link 19296090 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.93
GABA(A) autoreceptors enhance GABA release from human neocortex: towards a mechanism for high-frequency stimulation (HFS) in brain?
Localization (release) of GABA in brain associated with gaba
9) Confidence 0.53 Published 2009 Journal Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch. Pharmacol. Section Title Doc Link 19296090 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.81
Nonvesicular forms of GABA secretion (e.g., by reverse transporter action) have also been described and are likely important during development [18].
Localization (secretion) of GABA associated with gaba
10) Confidence 0.52 Published 2010 Journal Respir Res Section Body Doc Link PMC2988726 Disease Relevance 0.20 Pain Relevance 0.71
Interestingly, in the human airway epithelium there is no VGAT expression, suggesting GABA is released from airway epithelial cells in a vesicle independent fashion [18].
Localization (released) of GABA in epithelium associated with gaba
11) Confidence 0.52 Published 2010 Journal Respir Res Section Body Doc Link PMC2988726 Disease Relevance 0.14 Pain Relevance 0.61
Possible mechanisms of action include biochemical effects enhancing the ratio of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to glutamate, ion-channel actions (direct or indirect), and/ or enhancement of nonsynaptic GABA release.
Localization (release) of GABA associated with glutamate and gaba
12) Confidence 0.51 Published 1995 Journal Epilepsia Section Abstract Doc Link 8784216 Disease Relevance 0.08 Pain Relevance 0.61
Both drugs had no effect on exocytotic (3)H-glutamate release and also failed to modulate the release of (3)H-GABA and (3)H-glutamate caused by reversed uptake in the absence of external Ca(2+).
Localization (release) of GABA in external associated with gaba and glutamate
13) Confidence 0.50 Published 2009 Journal Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch. Pharmacol. Section Abstract Doc Link 19002437 Disease Relevance 0.06 Pain Relevance 1.45
An anticonvulsant mode of action of both drugs may be the reduction of a proconvulsant exocytotic GABA release.
Localization (release) of GABA associated with gaba and anticonvulsant
14) Confidence 0.50 Published 2009 Journal Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch. Pharmacol. Section Abstract Doc Link 19002437 Disease Relevance 0.05 Pain Relevance 1.26
When a GABA transport inhibitor was present throughout superfusion to isolate exocytotic conditions, gabapentin and pregabalin (100 microM each) reduced K(+)-evoked (3)H-GABA release by 39% and 47%, respectively.
Localization (release) of GABA associated with pregabalin, gaba and gabapentin
15) Confidence 0.50 Published 2009 Journal Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch. Pharmacol. Section Abstract Doc Link 19002437 Disease Relevance 0.08 Pain Relevance 1.42
The evidence presented herein confirms the colocalization of NO synthase activity and GABA-T immunoreactivity in subpopulations of enteric neurons and further allows the neurochemical classification of GABAergic neurons of the human colon into three subsets: (i) neurons colocalizing somatostatin-like immunoreactivity representing about 40% of the GABAergic neurons, (ii) neurons colocalizing enkephalin-like immunoreactivity, about 9% of the GABAergic neurons and (iii) neurons colocalizing NO synthase activity, about 23% of the GABAergic neurons.
Localization (colocalization) of GABA in neurons associated with gaba, gabaergic, somatostatin and enkephalin
16) Confidence 0.49 Published 1998 Journal J. Auton. Nerv. Syst. Section Abstract Doc Link 9531443 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 1.12
Subsequently, GABA is metabolized by a transamination reaction that is catalyzed by GABA transaminase (GABA-T).
Localization (metabolized) of GABA associated with gaba
17) Confidence 0.48 Published 2010 Journal Respir Res Section Body Doc Link PMC2988726 Disease Relevance 0.06 Pain Relevance 0.94
Moreover, in support of a terminal localization of GABA(A)Rs, the K+-evoked [3H]-GABA release from synaptosomes was enhanced by the GABA(A)R agonist muscimol (antagonized by GABA(A)R blockers).
Localization (localization) of GABA associated with gaba and agonist
18) Confidence 0.47 Published 2009 Journal Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch. Pharmacol. Section Abstract Doc Link 19296090 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.94
We conclude that HFS in human brain neocortex leads to a specific increase of GABA release, which is mediated by facilitatory GABA(A) autoreceptors located on soma, dendrites, and axon terminals of GABAergic neurons.
Localization (release) of GABA in dendrites associated with gaba and gabaergic
19) Confidence 0.47 Published 2009 Journal Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch. Pharmacol. Section Abstract Doc Link 19296090 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.91
High-frequency stimulation (HFS) in human neocortical slices induces gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release via GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) activation.
Localization (release) of GABA associated with gaba
20) Confidence 0.47 Published 2009 Journal Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch. Pharmacol. Section Abstract Doc Link 19296090 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.53

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