INT20712

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Context Info
Confidence 0.36
First Reported 1985
Last Reported 2009
Negated 1
Speculated 1
Reported most in Abstract
Documents 8
Total Number 9
Disease Relevance 1.06
Pain Relevance 1.67

This is a graph with borders and nodes. Maybe there is an Imagemap used so the nodes may be linking to some Pages.

Anatomy Link Frequency
MSNs 2
EPN 1
sinus 1
SNr 1
cerebral cortex 1
gp (Mus musculus)
Pain Link Frequency Relevance Heat
GABAergic 15 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Substantia nigra 7 99.76 Very High Very High Very High
cerebral cortex 2 99.62 Very High Very High Very High
dopamine receptor 3 99.58 Very High Very High Very High
Neuropeptide 5 98.90 Very High Very High Very High
tetrodotoxin 2 93.28 High High
Enkephalin 12 92.92 High High
narcan 10 92.40 High High
Action potential 2 90.76 High High
gABA 4 82.80 Quite High
Disease Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Sinusitis 5 99.24 Very High Very High Very High
Parkinson's Disease 4 90.56 High High
Bacterial Respiratory Disease 2 87.08 High High
Rupture 2 61.56 Quite High
Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome 2 59.16 Quite High
Knee Injuries 3 55.48 Quite High
Injury 10 50.36 Quite High
Athletic Injuries 1 48.68 Quite Low
Pain 19 35.44 Quite Low
Catalepsy 36 5.00 Very Low Very Low Very Low

Sentences Mentioned In

Key: Protein Mutation Event Anatomy Negation Speculation Pain term Disease term
Each year, around 20 in every 1,000 people in the UK consult their GP about a suspected sinus infection,1 which means that each GP sees an average of about 50 such cases annually.2 Although most people recover from acute sinusitis with or without treatment within 10 days of seeing a GP,2 it is estimated that around 92% of those who consult their GP with a sinus infection are prescribed an antibacterial.1 Here we review the management of patients with acute sinusitis, and the place of antibacterial and other treatments.
Regulation (consult) of GP in sinus associated with sinusitis and bacterial respiratory disease
1) Confidence 0.36 Published 2009 Journal Drug Ther Bull Section Abstract Doc Link 19261837 Disease Relevance 0.61 Pain Relevance 0
Further, it is of interest to explore differences between athletes and non-athletes regarding the GP's initial treatment, medical consumption and prognosis of the two groups.
Regulation (regarding) of GP
2) Confidence 0.22 Published 2008 Journal BMC Musculoskelet Disord Section Body Doc Link PMC2278141 Disease Relevance 0.28 Pain Relevance 0.06
We hypothesize that, after the striatal dopaminergic homeostasis breakdown, a modification in the expression of several striatal markers (neuropeptide precursors and dopamine receptors) may occur before a change in the activity of both globus pallidus (GP) and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) in response to a partial nigrostriatal lesion.
Regulation (change) of GP in globus pallidus associated with substantia nigra, dopamine receptor and neuropeptide
3) Confidence 0.18 Published 2003 Journal Neurobiol. Dis. Section Abstract Doc Link 12758066 Disease Relevance 0.17 Pain Relevance 0.29
Our interest was focused on the two other populations named medium spiny neurons (MSNs), which send efferents to the GP and the SNr.
Regulation (efferents) of GP in MSNs
4) Confidence 0.02 Published 2009 Journal PLoS ONE Section Body Doc Link PMC2704377 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.09
-flupentixol injection (0.3 mg/kg) induced a clear excitatory effect on GP neurons [F?
Spec (clear) Regulation (effect) of GP in neurons
5) Confidence 0.02 Published 2009 Journal PLoS ONE Section Body Doc Link PMC2704377 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0
Since chemical and electrolytic lesions of the CDp and GP result in a reduction in ENKs and their receptors and in motor asymmetry, there may be a role for CDp and GP ENKs in rotational behavior and bodily asymmetry.
Regulation (role) of GP in CDp
6) Confidence 0.01 Published 1985 Journal Pharmacol. Biochem. Behav. Section Abstract Doc Link 4059307 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.20
This study provides biochemical evidence for differential regulation of striatal GABAergic output to GP and EPN/SNr.
Regulation (regulation) of GP in SNr associated with gabaergic
7) Confidence 0.01 Published 1985 Journal J. Neurochem. Section Abstract Doc Link 2995585 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.36
It is concluded that in the rat cerebral cortex: (a) Li+ does not affect the function of either the phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C enzyme itself or the Gp coupled to this enzyme; (b) the difference between the additivity between NaF and carbachol seen at different assay [K+] may reflect the K(+)-dependent changes in the tetrodotoxin-resistant and tetrodotoxin-sensitive pathways of carbachol stimulation of inositol phospholipid breakdown reported by Gurwitz and Sokolovsky (1987, Biochemistry 26, 633); and (c) the effect of K+ on muscarinic receptor-coupled inositol phospholipid breakdown is not found for muscarinic receptors inhibitorily coupled to adenylate cyclase.
Neg (not) Regulation (affect) of Gp in cerebral cortex associated with tetrodotoxin and cerebral cortex
8) Confidence 0.00 Published 1990 Journal Eur. J. Pharmacol. Section Abstract Doc Link 2155122 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.31
This study provides biochemical evidence for differential regulation of striatal GABAergic output to GP and EPN/SNr.
Regulation (regulation) of GP in EPN associated with gabaergic
9) Confidence 0.00 Published 1985 Journal J. Neurochem. Section Abstract Doc Link 2995585 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.36

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