INT209354

From wiki-pain
Jump to: navigation, search
Context Info
Confidence 0.58
First Reported 2007
Last Reported 2010
Negated 1
Speculated 0
Reported most in Body
Documents 15
Total Number 18
Disease Relevance 37.52
Pain Relevance 0.29

This is a graph with borders and nodes. Maybe there is an Imagemap used so the nodes may be linking to some Pages.

endosome (SLC9A6) transport (SLC9A6) mitochondrion (SLC9A6)
plasma membrane (SLC9A6) transmembrane transport (SLC9A6)
Anatomy Link Frequency
skin 2
nasal 1
foot 1
SLC9A6 (Homo sapiens)
Pain Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Pain 15 99.20 Very High Very High Very High
topical agent 39 75.68 Quite High
alcohol 8 5.00 Very Low Very Low Very Low
dexamethasone 4 5.00 Very Low Very Low Very Low
anesthesia 4 5.00 Very Low Very Low Very Low
cva 4 5.00 Very Low Very Low Very Low
backache 2 5.00 Very Low Very Low Very Low
headache 1 5.00 Very Low Very Low Very Low
Disease Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Mrsa Infection 2115 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Infection 644 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Injury 858 99.98 Very High Very High Very High
Bacteremia 208 99.88 Very High Very High Very High
Abscess 53 99.76 Very High Very High Very High
Bites And Stings 2 99.36 Very High Very High Very High
Diabetic Foot Ulcer 143 99.24 Very High Very High Very High
Blister 1 98.62 Very High Very High Very High
Necrosis 52 98.60 Very High Very High Very High
Furunculosis 1 98.42 Very High Very High Very High

Sentences Mentioned In

Key: Protein Mutation Event Anatomy Negation Speculation Pain term Disease term
Skin lesions such as furuncles, blisters, abscesses and suspected spider-bite lesions should be suspects for MRSA infections, particularly in areas where spider-bites are not endemic [13].
Gene_expression (infections) of MRSA in Skin associated with mrsa infection, furunculosis, bites and stings, blister, abscess and infection
1) Confidence 0.58 Published 2007 Journal Chiropr Osteopat Section Body Doc Link PMC1894808 Disease Relevance 2.30 Pain Relevance 0
In late 2006 the UK Department of Health recommended that all elective admissions in England should be screened for MRSA and if found positive should then undergo decolonization regime.5 Following comments by the Royal College of Ophthalmologists and others, it was clarified in refreshed operational guidance to the National Health Service (NHS) in early 2008 that day-case ophthalmology patients in the English NHS did not have to undergo routine MRSA screening.6,7 A survey of UK ophthalmology departments undertaken in September 2005 demonstrated significant variability surrounding local MRSA screening practices.4 Following a consideration of available evidence The MRSA Screening Pathfinder Programme in Scotland has not recommended universal MRSA screening requirements in its Interim Report.8 MRSA screening is not currently required in England or Scotland for day-care ophthalmology patients, but is required for admitted ophthalmic patients.7,9
Gene_expression (routine) of MRSA associated with mrsa infection
2) Confidence 0.38 Published 2010 Journal Clinical Ophthalmology (Auckland, N.Z.) Section Body Doc Link PMC2964962 Disease Relevance 1.36 Pain Relevance 0
In late 2006 the UK Department of Health recommended that all elective admissions in England should be screened for MRSA and if found positive should then undergo decolonization regime.5 Following comments by the Royal College of Ophthalmologists and others, it was clarified in refreshed operational guidance to the National Health Service (NHS) in early 2008 that day-case ophthalmology patients in the English NHS did not have to undergo routine MRSA screening.6,7 A survey of UK ophthalmology departments undertaken in September 2005 demonstrated significant variability surrounding local MRSA screening practices.4 Following a consideration of available evidence The MRSA Screening Pathfinder Programme in Scotland has not recommended universal MRSA screening requirements in its Interim Report.8 MRSA screening is not currently required in England or Scotland for day-care ophthalmology patients, but is required for admitted ophthalmic patients.7,9
Gene_expression (screened) of MRSA associated with mrsa infection
3) Confidence 0.38 Published 2010 Journal Clinical Ophthalmology (Auckland, N.Z.) Section Body Doc Link PMC2964962 Disease Relevance 1.39 Pain Relevance 0
In late 2006 the UK Department of Health recommended that all elective admissions in England should be screened for MRSA and if found positive should then undergo decolonization regime.5 Following comments by the Royal College of Ophthalmologists and others, it was clarified in refreshed operational guidance to the National Health Service (NHS) in early 2008 that day-case ophthalmology patients in the English NHS did not have to undergo routine MRSA screening.6,7 A survey of UK ophthalmology departments undertaken in September 2005 demonstrated significant variability surrounding local MRSA screening practices.4 Following a consideration of available evidence The MRSA Screening Pathfinder Programme in Scotland has not recommended universal MRSA screening requirements in its Interim Report.8 MRSA screening is not currently required in England or Scotland for day-care ophthalmology patients, but is required for admitted ophthalmic patients.7,9
Gene_expression (screening) of MRSA associated with mrsa infection
4) Confidence 0.38 Published 2010 Journal Clinical Ophthalmology (Auckland, N.Z.) Section Body Doc Link PMC2964962 Disease Relevance 1.21 Pain Relevance 0
In late 2006 the UK Department of Health recommended that all elective admissions in England should be screened for MRSA and if found positive should then undergo decolonization regime.5 Following comments by the Royal College of Ophthalmologists and others, it was clarified in refreshed operational guidance to the National Health Service (NHS) in early 2008 that day-case ophthalmology patients in the English NHS did not have to undergo routine MRSA screening.6,7 A survey of UK ophthalmology departments undertaken in September 2005 demonstrated significant variability surrounding local MRSA screening practices.4 Following a consideration of available evidence The MRSA Screening Pathfinder Programme in Scotland has not recommended universal MRSA screening requirements in its Interim Report.8 MRSA screening is not currently required in England or Scotland for day-care ophthalmology patients, but is required for admitted ophthalmic patients.7,9
Gene_expression (screening) of MRSA associated with mrsa infection
5) Confidence 0.38 Published 2010 Journal Clinical Ophthalmology (Auckland, N.Z.) Section Body Doc Link PMC2964962 Disease Relevance 1.38 Pain Relevance 0
To date, CA-MRSA infections tend to be disproportionately found in healthy children and young adults, sports participants, military recruits, and people with a lower socioeconomic status.
Gene_expression (infections) of MRSA associated with mrsa infection and infection
6) Confidence 0.37 Published 2007 Journal Journal of Burns and Wounds Section Body Doc Link PMC2104747 Disease Relevance 1.85 Pain Relevance 0
Also, the SCC mec type IV and the PVL are usually present, which are typically not found in HA-MRSA.
Neg (not) Gene_expression (found) of HA-MRSA associated with mrsa infection
7) Confidence 0.37 Published 2007 Journal Journal of Burns and Wounds Section Body Doc Link PMC2104747 Disease Relevance 1.36 Pain Relevance 0
The specific characteristics of HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA are presented, as well as, the impact these organisms have on acute and chronic wounds.3–6
Gene_expression (presented) of MRSA associated with mrsa infection and injury
8) Confidence 0.37 Published 2007 Journal Journal of Burns and Wounds Section Body Doc Link PMC2104747 Disease Relevance 2.38 Pain Relevance 0
It has been well demonstrated that patients admitted for an acute injury or illness, who have chronic wounds growing MRSA, have an increased risk of a bacteremia with MRSA being the organism.57
Gene_expression (being) of MRSA associated with mrsa infection, bacteremia and injury
9) Confidence 0.37 Published 2007 Journal Journal of Burns and Wounds Section Body Doc Link PMC2104747 Disease Relevance 3.19 Pain Relevance 0.03
It has been well demonstrated that patients admitted for an acute injury or illness, who have chronic wounds growing MRSA, have an increased risk of a bacteremia with MRSA being the organism.57
Gene_expression (growing) of MRSA associated with mrsa infection, bacteremia and injury
10) Confidence 0.37 Published 2007 Journal Journal of Burns and Wounds Section Body Doc Link PMC2104747 Disease Relevance 3.21 Pain Relevance 0.03
One common and quite interesting presentation of a CA-MRSA infection is that of a small painful skin pustule with surrounding cellulitis, often described as a “spider bite” which then rapidly evolves into an abscess with progressive cellulitis (Figs. 3 and 4).
Gene_expression (infection) of MRSA in skin associated with staphylococcus infection, mrsa infection, pain, arachnidism, abscess and infection
11) Confidence 0.37 Published 2007 Journal Journal of Burns and Wounds Section Body Doc Link PMC2104747 Disease Relevance 2.78 Pain Relevance 0.10
The specific characteristics of HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA are presented, as well as, the impact these organisms have on acute and chronic wounds.3–6
Gene_expression (presented) of HA-MRSA associated with mrsa infection and injury
12) Confidence 0.37 Published 2007 Journal Journal of Burns and Wounds Section Body Doc Link PMC2104747 Disease Relevance 2.44 Pain Relevance 0
The methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacterium was recognized as an important clinical pathogen in the 1960s where it was found exclusively in a hospital setting.1,2
Gene_expression (resistant) of MRSA associated with mrsa infection
13) Confidence 0.37 Published 2007 Journal Journal of Burns and Wounds Section Body Doc Link PMC2104747 Disease Relevance 0.73 Pain Relevance 0
The MRSA presents two problems, the first relates to the chronic wound being a source of other MRSA nosocomial infections and the second relates to the impact of MRSA on the chronic wound itself.
Gene_expression (presents) of MRSA associated with mrsa infection, injury and nosocomial and community acquired bacterial infections
14) Confidence 0.37 Published 2007 Journal Journal of Burns and Wounds Section Body Doc Link PMC2104747 Disease Relevance 3.15 Pain Relevance 0.04
The risk factors for an MRSA infection were noted to be those described in Table 1.
Gene_expression (infection) of MRSA associated with mrsa infection and infection
15) Confidence 0.37 Published 2007 Journal Journal of Burns and Wounds Section Body Doc Link PMC2104747 Disease Relevance 2.31 Pain Relevance 0
Topical intranasal Mupirocin cream is the most commonly used treatment for MRSA nasal colonization.1,34
Gene_expression (nasal) of MRSA in nasal associated with mrsa infection
16) Confidence 0.37 Published 2007 Journal Journal of Burns and Wounds Section Body Doc Link PMC2104747 Disease Relevance 1.24 Pain Relevance 0
However, CA-MRSA tends to produce more abscess formation and tissue necrosis.
Gene_expression (produce) of MRSA associated with mrsa infection, necrosis and abscess
17) Confidence 0.37 Published 2007 Journal Journal of Burns and Wounds Section Body Doc Link PMC2104747 Disease Relevance 2.88 Pain Relevance 0.09
Other studies have reported an increase in hospital stay, increased cost, and increased morbidity and mortality with an MRSA foot infection compared to other diabetic foot ulcer infections.62–64
Gene_expression (infection) of MRSA in foot associated with mrsa infection, diabetic foot ulcer and infection
18) Confidence 0.37 Published 2007 Journal Journal of Burns and Wounds Section Body Doc Link PMC2104747 Disease Relevance 2.35 Pain Relevance 0

General Comments

This test has worked.

Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox