INT23665

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Context Info
Confidence 0.58
First Reported 1986
Last Reported 2010
Negated 0
Speculated 1
Reported most in Body
Documents 14
Total Number 15
Disease Relevance 6.74
Pain Relevance 1.08

This is a graph with borders and nodes. Maybe there is an Imagemap used so the nodes may be linking to some Pages.

transferase activity, transferring glycosyl groups (St8sia2) Golgi apparatus (St8sia2)
Anatomy Link Frequency
RBA 3
PSP 3
liver 1
muscle 1
St8sia2 (Mus musculus)
Pain Link Frequency Relevance Heat
tetrodotoxin 29 99.66 Very High Very High Very High
GABA receptor 1 99.56 Very High Very High Very High
sodium channel 17 99.12 Very High Very High Very High
Opioid 1 98.68 Very High Very High Very High
GABAergic 6 97.32 Very High Very High Very High
Dopamine 2 96.72 Very High Very High Very High
Kinase C 12 94.28 High High
Crohn's disease 1 93.92 High High
Inflammation 3 55.60 Quite High
agonist 47 50.00 Quite Low
Disease Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Toxicity 146 99.40 Very High Very High Very High
Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome 41 99.12 Very High Very High Very High
Shellfish Poisoning 204 98.96 Very High Very High Very High
Sprains And Strains 12 98.84 Very High Very High Very High
Infection 5 98.28 Very High Very High Very High
Poisoning 517 97.90 Very High Very High Very High
Neuroblastoma 25 97.22 Very High Very High Very High
Targeted Disruption 5 95.20 Very High Very High Very High
Graft Vs Host Disease 1 94.80 High High
Disease 18 93.92 High High

Sentences Mentioned In

Key: Protein Mutation Event Anatomy Negation Speculation Pain term Disease term
The sodium channel blockers tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) and the channel activator batrachotoxin (BTX) produce their effects by binding to separate and distinct sites on the channel protein.
Gene_expression (produce) of STX associated with tetrodotoxin and sodium channel
1) Confidence 0.58 Published 1986 Journal J. Neurosci. Section Abstract Doc Link 2426426 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.61
All clonal cultures (n = 11) and natural bloom samples (n = 2) (> 3 million cells/L) of P. bahamense (Figure 4) obtained from the IRL tested positive for STX by HPLC, LC-MS, Ridascreen ELISA, MIST Alert, and RBA assays.
Gene_expression (tested) of STX in RBA
2) Confidence 0.23 Published 2006 Journal Environ Health Perspect Section Body Doc Link PMC1626430 Disease Relevance 0.28 Pain Relevance 0
Thus far, routine monitoring by Florida state agencies has determined that STX levels in shellfish, principally hard clams (Mercenaria spp.), are not a significant risk to public health (Landsberg et al. 2005).
Gene_expression (levels) of STX
3) Confidence 0.23 Published 2006 Journal Environ Health Perspect Section Body Doc Link PMC1626430 Disease Relevance 0.48 Pain Relevance 0
We found the STX profile of P. bahamense isolates from Florida to be similar to, but proportionately different from, the toxin profile of southern puffer fish fillet (Etheridge et al. 2006; Quilliam et al. 2004), and we identified P. bahamense as the putative source of the STXs.
Gene_expression (profile) of STX
4) Confidence 0.20 Published 2006 Journal Environ Health Perspect Section Body Doc Link PMC1626430 Disease Relevance 0.41 Pain Relevance 0
Over a period of at least 6 months, STX levels in the IRL southern puffer fish fluctuated but remained at highly toxic concentrations.
Gene_expression (levels) of STX
5) Confidence 0.20 Published 2006 Journal Environ Health Perspect Section Body Doc Link PMC1626430 Disease Relevance 0.16 Pain Relevance 0
By MBA, MNCA, and RBA, STX concentrations in liver were 83–1,034 (mean ± SD, 282.6 ± 261.5), 60–420 (169.1 ± 106.2) and 16–711 (223.1 ± 186.5) ?
Gene_expression (concentrations) of STX in RBA
6) Confidence 0.20 Published 2006 Journal Environ Health Perspect Section Body Doc Link PMC1626430 Disease Relevance 0.06 Pain Relevance 0
Maximum STX concentrations in the liver of southern and checkered puffer fish were 1,443 and 51.1 ?
Gene_expression (concentrations) of STX in liver
7) Confidence 0.20 Published 2006 Journal Environ Health Perspect Section Body Doc Link PMC1626430 Disease Relevance 0.07 Pain Relevance 0
By MBA, MNCA, and RBA, ranges of STX concentrations in muscle were 197–5,264 (mean ± SD, 2,302.3 ± 1,539.3), 120–2,294 (957.7 ± 659.5), and 198–6,091 (2,439 ± 1,995.3) ?
Gene_expression (concentrations) of STX in muscle
8) Confidence 0.20 Published 2006 Journal Environ Health Perspect Section Body Doc Link PMC1626430 Disease Relevance 0.06 Pain Relevance 0
PSP can be fatal (Kao 1993), but the successful implementation of programs monitoring STX-producing microalgae and STXs in shellfish has helped minimize the risk of toxin exposure to humans.
Gene_expression (producing) of STX in PSP associated with shellfish poisoning
9) Confidence 0.18 Published 2006 Journal Environ Health Perspect Section Body Doc Link PMC1626430 Disease Relevance 0.66 Pain Relevance 0
The epidemiology of PSP incidents is related to the global distribution of the various STX-producing species and their toxigenic strains.
Gene_expression (producing) of STX in PSP associated with shellfish poisoning and sprains and strains
10) Confidence 0.18 Published 2006 Journal Environ Health Perspect Section Body Doc Link PMC1626430 Disease Relevance 0.82 Pain Relevance 0
Globally, human food-poisoning incidents from STX exposure are usually caused by toxic marine shellfish (Kao 1993) that filter-feed on STX-producing microalgae.
Gene_expression (producing) of STX associated with poisoning
11) Confidence 0.18 Published 2006 Journal Environ Health Perspect Section Body Doc Link PMC1626430 Disease Relevance 0.71 Pain Relevance 0
PSP is caused by the consumption of toxic shellfish (Shumway 1990) and rarely by fish that have have become toxic after feeding on STX-producing microalgae (Maclean 1979).
Gene_expression (producing) of STX in PSP associated with shellfish poisoning
12) Confidence 0.18 Published 2006 Journal Environ Health Perspect Section Body Doc Link PMC1626430 Disease Relevance 0.85 Pain Relevance 0.11
We used the standard mouse bioassay (MBA), receptor binding assay (RBA), mouse neuroblastoma cytotoxicity assay (MNCA), Ridascreen ELISA, MIST Alert assay, HPLC, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to determine the presence of STX, decarbamoyl STX (dc-STX), and N-sulfocarbamoyl (B1) toxin in puffer fish tissues, clonal cultures, and natural bloom samples of Pyrodinium bahamense from the IRL.


Spec (determine) Gene_expression (presence) of STX in RBA associated with neuroblastoma
13) Confidence 0.18 Published 2006 Journal Environ Health Perspect Section Abstract Doc Link PMC1626430 Disease Relevance 0.42 Pain Relevance 0
HUS develops as a complication of Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infection of which serotype O157:H7 is the most commonly detected.
Gene_expression (producing) of Stx associated with hemolytic uremic syndrome and infection
14) Confidence 0.08 Published 2009 Journal PLoS ONE Section Body Doc Link PMC2735777 Disease Relevance 1.58 Pain Relevance 0.07
The synthetic nonsteroidal compound, STX binds to Gq-mER and mimics the action of E2 in ER?
Gene_expression (synthetic) of STX
15) Confidence 0.06 Published 2010 Journal PLoS ONE Section Body Doc Link PMC2910705 Disease Relevance 0.18 Pain Relevance 0.29

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