INT246333

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Context Info
Confidence 0.51
First Reported 2008
Last Reported 2008
Negated 0
Speculated 1
Reported most in Body
Documents 1
Total Number 9
Disease Relevance 1.02
Pain Relevance 3.24

This is a graph with borders and nodes. Maybe there is an Imagemap used so the nodes may be linking to some Pages.

mitochondrion (Sars) ligase activity (Sars) cytoplasm (Sars)
Anatomy Link Frequency
respiratory 2
lung 1
Sars (Rattus norvegicus)
Pain Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Glutamate 765 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
gABA 54 97.16 Very High Very High Very High
medulla 162 95.92 Very High Very High Very High
antagonist 99 93.16 High High
excitatory amino acid 99 82.00 Quite High
vagus nerve 153 78.08 Quite High
addiction 63 66.24 Quite High
Inflammation 9 62.36 Quite High
agonist 9 61.56 Quite High
adenocard 9 50.00 Quite Low
Disease Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Cv Unclassified Under Development 9 94.84 High High
Hypoxia 18 73.44 Quite High
Apnoea 81 70.64 Quite High
Hypercapnia 18 70.40 Quite High
Dyspnea 45 68.88 Quite High
INFLAMMATION 9 62.36 Quite High
Overdose 9 5.00 Very Low Very Low Very Low
Stroke 9 5.00 Very Low Very Low Very Low
Peripheral Arterial Disease 9 5.00 Very Low Very Low Very Low

Sentences Mentioned In

Key: Protein Mutation Event Anatomy Negation Speculation Pain term Disease term
Since our evidence suggests that ATP and glutamate are both released from the SARs central terminals, we think that the second explanation is also unlikely.
Localization (released) of SARs associated with glutamate
1) Confidence 0.51 Published 2008 Journal The Journal of Physiology Section Body Doc Link PMC2538935 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.53
It remains to be determined whether different subsets of SARs release either ATP, glutamate, or both transmitters.


Spec (whether) Localization (release) of SARs associated with glutamate
2) Confidence 0.51 Published 2008 Journal The Journal of Physiology Section Body Doc Link PMC2538935 Disease Relevance 0.14 Pain Relevance 0.23
Our data therefore suggest very strongly that SARs indeed release ATP and glutamate from their central terminals in the NTS.


Localization (release) of SARs associated with glutamate
3) Confidence 0.51 Published 2008 Journal The Journal of Physiology Section Body Doc Link PMC2538935 Disease Relevance 0.30 Pain Relevance 0.53
Second, rhythmic signals were not detected by either ATP or glutamate biosensors when placed outside the circumscribed NTS area where SARs terminate (Bonham & McCrimmon, 1990).
Localization (area) of SARs associated with glutamate
4) Confidence 0.48 Published 2008 Journal The Journal of Physiology Section Body Doc Link PMC2538935 Disease Relevance 0.19 Pain Relevance 0.29
These data suggest that ATP released from the central terminals of the SARs does not facilitate release of glutamate by presynaptic P2 receptor activation.
Localization (released) of SARs associated with glutamate
5) Confidence 0.48 Published 2008 Journal The Journal of Physiology Section Body Doc Link PMC2538935 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.36
It is possible that ATP released from the central terminals of the SARs is acting presynaptically to facilitate release of glutamate from the same/adjacent terminals.
Localization (release) of SARs associated with glutamate
6) Confidence 0.48 Published 2008 Journal The Journal of Physiology Section Body Doc Link PMC2538935 Disease Relevance 0.12 Pain Relevance 0.31
This observation does not unambiguously indicate that the central terminals of SARs release ATP and glutamate; they could be released instead by the populations of second-order relay (e.g. pump cells) or other NTS neurones with rhythmic respiratory-related discharge (e.g.
Localization (release) of SARs in respiratory associated with glutamate
7) Confidence 0.45 Published 2008 Journal The Journal of Physiology Section Body Doc Link PMC2538935 Disease Relevance 0.13 Pain Relevance 0.39
This observation does not unambiguously indicate that the central terminals of SARs release ATP and glutamate; they could be released instead by the populations of second-order relay (e.g. pump cells) or other NTS neurones with rhythmic respiratory-related discharge (e.g.
Localization (released) of SARs in respiratory associated with glutamate
8) Confidence 0.45 Published 2008 Journal The Journal of Physiology Section Body Doc Link PMC2538935 Disease Relevance 0.14 Pain Relevance 0.40
Here we demonstrate that during lung inflation SARs release both ATP and glutamate from their central terminals to activate these NTS neurones.
Localization (release) of SARs in lung associated with glutamate
9) Confidence 0.45 Published 2008 Journal The Journal of Physiology Section Abstract Doc Link PMC2538935 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.20

General Comments

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