INT550

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Context Info
Confidence 0.43
First Reported 1975
Last Reported 2011
Negated 0
Speculated 0
Reported most in Body
Documents 66
Total Number 66
Disease Relevance 44.71
Pain Relevance 3.04

This is a graph with borders and nodes. Maybe there is an Imagemap used so the nodes may be linking to some Pages.

transport (LDLR) small molecule metabolic process (LDLR) plasma membrane (LDLR)
lipid metabolic process (LDLR) lysosome (LDLR)
Anatomy Link Frequency
plasma 7
blood 3
arms 3
heart 3
coronary artery 1
LDLR (Homo sapiens)
Pain Link Frequency Relevance Heat
qutenza 5 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Bile 150 98.74 Very High Very High Very High
tolerance 21 97.40 Very High Very High Very High
ischemia 4 95.76 Very High Very High Very High
Inflammation 137 95.08 Very High Very High Very High
rheumatoid arthritis 102 94.68 High High
Angina 33 93.36 High High
Bioavailability 30 91.28 High High
cINOD 51 91.04 High High
aspirin 36 90.80 High High
Disease Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Disorder Of Lipid Metabolism 1191 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Diabetes Mellitus 522 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Obesity 289 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Abdominal Obesity 25 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Cv Unclassified Under Development 25 99.90 Very High Very High Very High
Hyperlipidemia 209 99.56 Very High Very High Very High
Weight Loss 82 99.56 Very High Very High Very High
Coronary Artery Disease 360 99.52 Very High Very High Very High
Dyslipidemia /

Combined Dyslipidemia

230 99.30 Very High Very High Very High
Hypolipidemia 41 99.28 Very High Very High Very High

Sentences Mentioned In

Key: Protein Mutation Event Anatomy Negation Speculation Pain term Disease term
Inhibition of human low density lipoprotein oxidation by active principles from spices.
Negative_regulation (Inhibition) of low density lipoprotein associated with qutenza
1) Confidence 0.43 Published 2002 Journal Mol. Cell. Biochem. Section Title Doc Link 11936843 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.25
A pronounced reduction in plasma cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (L.D.L.) concentrations was achieved by exchanging each patient's plasma with cholesterol-free plasma protein fraction (B.P.), at 3-weekly intervals on an outpatient basis.
Negative_regulation (reduction) of low-density lipoprotein in plasma
2) Confidence 0.43 Published 1975 Journal Lancet Section Abstract Doc Link 48833 Disease Relevance 0.40 Pain Relevance 0.06
Simvastatin 40-80 mg/day effectively reduces serum low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol levels.
Negative_regulation (reduces) of low density lipoprotein
3) Confidence 0.42 Published 2003 Journal Drug Saf Section Abstract Doc Link 12908847 Disease Relevance 0.80 Pain Relevance 0.04
Generally, niacin decreases total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol and lipoprotein(a), while it increases HDL-cholesterol.10,11 The effects of niacin are summarized in Table 3.
Negative_regulation (decreases) of LDL-cholesterol associated with disorder of lipid metabolism
4) Confidence 0.40 Published 2009 Journal Vascular Health and Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2788595 Disease Relevance 0.25 Pain Relevance 0.04
The addition of laropiprant does not change the effect of niacin on lipids.49,50 In a study evaluating more than 1300 patients, niacin with or without laropiprant decreased LDL-cholesterol by 18.4%, triglycerides by 25.8% and increased HDL-cholesterol by 20%.49 For none of the lipid parameters the effect was altered by the addition of laropiprant.
Negative_regulation (decreased) of LDL-cholesterol associated with disorder of lipid metabolism
5) Confidence 0.40 Published 2009 Journal Vascular Health and Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2788595 Disease Relevance 0.84 Pain Relevance 0.14
Generally it can be assumed that niacin at a dose of more than 1.5 g/day will decrease LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and lipoprotein(a) by approximately 20%, while it will increase HDL-cholesterol also by approximately 20% (“rule of 20%”).9,15

Mechanism of action of niacin

Negative_regulation (decrease) of LDL-cholesterol associated with disorder of lipid metabolism
6) Confidence 0.40 Published 2009 Journal Vascular Health and Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2788595 Disease Relevance 0.36 Pain Relevance 0.03
In a recent study comparing 4 treatment arms in 293 patients with dyslipidemia it was shown that rosuvastatin (40 mg/day), simvastatin with ezetimibe (40 mg/10 mg per day), rosuvastatin with niacin (20 mg/2000 mg per day), and atorvastatin with niacin (40 mg/2000 mg per day) resulted in an identical reduction of LDL-cholesterol (?
Negative_regulation (reduction) of LDL-cholesterol in arms
7) Confidence 0.40 Published 2009 Journal Vascular Health and Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2788595 Disease Relevance 0.29 Pain Relevance 0.04
Low-density lipoprotein levels were usually reduced in those patients with elevated levels and high-density lipoprotein levels increased when baseline levels were low.
Negative_regulation (reduced) of Low-density lipoprotein
8) Confidence 0.39 Published 1987 Journal Am. J. Med. Section Abstract Doc Link 3318450 Disease Relevance 0.65 Pain Relevance 0.06
For example, under increased dietary cholesterol challenge, the LDL receptor, responsible for the uptake of LDL-C is downregulated [1].
Negative_regulation (downregulated) of LDL receptor associated with disorder of lipid metabolism
9) Confidence 0.38 Published 2006 Journal Lipids Health Dis Section Body Doc Link PMC1564017 Disease Relevance 0.19 Pain Relevance 0.08
In patients with hyperlipidemia, omega 3 fatty acids decrease low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol if the saturated fatty acid content is decreased, otherwise there is a slight increase, but at high doses (32 g) they lower LDL cholesterol; furthermore, they consistently lower serum triglycerides in normal subjects and in patients with hypertriglyceridemia whereas the effect on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) varies from no effect to slight increases.
Negative_regulation (decreased) of low-density-lipoprotein associated with hyperlipidemia and disorder of lipid metabolism
10) Confidence 0.37 Published 1991 Journal Am. J. Clin. Nutr. Section Abstract Doc Link 1908631 Disease Relevance 0.71 Pain Relevance 0.08
In patients with hyperlipidemia, omega 3 fatty acids decrease low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol if the saturated fatty acid content is decreased, otherwise there is a slight increase, but at high doses (32 g) they lower LDL cholesterol; furthermore, they consistently lower serum triglycerides in normal subjects and in patients with hypertriglyceridemia whereas the effect on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) varies from no effect to slight increases.
Negative_regulation (decrease) of low-density-lipoprotein associated with hyperlipidemia and disorder of lipid metabolism
11) Confidence 0.37 Published 1991 Journal Am. J. Clin. Nutr. Section Abstract Doc Link 1908631 Disease Relevance 0.60 Pain Relevance 0
We have shown previously that the expression of mRNA for the LDLr in THP-1 macrophages is decreased by CRLPs while the expression of LRP mRNA is increased [18], and the present study, which shows a decrease of about 73% in LDLr mRNA and a 2.7fold rise in LRP mRNA after exposure of the macrophages to CRLPs, is in agreement with these findings.
Negative_regulation (decrease) of LDLr mRNA in THP-1
12) Confidence 0.34 Published 2007 Journal Biochim Biophys Acta Section Body Doc Link PMC1906864 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0
Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol reduction to less than 78 mg/dL may be associated with reduction of atheroma burden.
Negative_regulation (reduction) of Low-density lipoprotein associated with atherosclerosis
13) Confidence 0.33 Published 2009 Journal Vascular Health and Risk Management Section Abstract Doc Link PMC2686255 Disease Relevance 0.25 Pain Relevance 0
Niacin/laropiprant, ezetimibe or a bile acid binding compound can be added, since all provide further LDL-cholesterol reduction by approximately 20% (which may vary considerably in individual patients).
Negative_regulation (reduction) of LDL-cholesterol in bile associated with bile
14) Confidence 0.30 Published 2009 Journal Vascular Health and Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2788595 Disease Relevance 0.75 Pain Relevance 0.13
The importance of treating abnormal lipid concentrations to prevent atherosclerotic events is also reflected in the guidelines of professional associations such as the American Heart Assocation, European Society of Cardiology and others.5,6 These guidelines have focused on LDL-cholesterol reduction although over the last decade it has been recognized that triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, and lipoprotein(a) are not only important as predictors of atherosclerotic events but are potential therapeutic targets.7 This is very important since LDL-lowering strategies can obviously not prevent all atherosclerotic events.
Negative_regulation (reduction) of LDL-cholesterol in Heart associated with atherosclerosis and disorder of lipid metabolism
15) Confidence 0.30 Published 2009 Journal Vascular Health and Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2788595 Disease Relevance 0.82 Pain Relevance 0
It is conceivable that more aggressive LDL-cholesterol reduction might further prevent atherosclerotic events.
Negative_regulation (reduction) of LDL-cholesterol associated with atherosclerosis
16) Confidence 0.30 Published 2009 Journal Vascular Health and Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2788595 Disease Relevance 0.82 Pain Relevance 0
There are multiple reasons, the most important being the high rate of side effects and the stronger LDL-cholesterol reduction and the better documented effects of statins.4,9 Although extended-release forms of niacin (ERN) have somewhat less side effects in clinical practice, niacin is rarely used.


Negative_regulation (reduction) of LDL-cholesterol
17) Confidence 0.30 Published 2009 Journal Vascular Health and Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2788595 Disease Relevance 0.24 Pain Relevance 0.03
Most of our current strategies with respect to lipids focus on low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol reduction.
Negative_regulation (reduction) of low-density lipoprotein
18) Confidence 0.30 Published 2009 Journal Vascular Health and Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2788595 Disease Relevance 1.19 Pain Relevance 0
There may have been a small increase in absolute LDL-cholesterol levels as a result of the drift in HDL-cholesterol (because the calculated difference method has been used for LDL-cholesterol), but the sustained difference between the two groups represents a reduction of approximately 9% in LDL-cholesterol at 3 years attributable to active treatment.
Negative_regulation (reduction) of LDL-cholesterol associated with disorder of lipid metabolism
19) Confidence 0.29 Published 2001 Journal Curr Control Trials Cardiovasc Med Section Body Doc Link PMC57751 Disease Relevance 0.31 Pain Relevance 0.05
Current status and future directions in lipid management: emphasizing low-density lipoproteins, high-density lipoproteins, and triglycerides as targets for therapy

Current lipid management guidelines are focused on decreasing low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) levels as the primary target for reducing coronary heart disease (CHD) risk.

Negative_regulation (decreasing) of low-density lipoprotein in heart associated with coronary artery disease
20) Confidence 0.29 Published 2010 Journal Vascular Health and Risk Management Section Title Doc Link PMC2835557 Disease Relevance 1.02 Pain Relevance 0

General Comments

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