INT61312

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Context Info
Confidence 0.10
First Reported 1995
Last Reported 2009
Negated 0
Speculated 0
Reported most in Abstract
Documents 3
Total Number 4
Disease Relevance 0.74
Pain Relevance 5.12

This is a graph with borders and nodes. Maybe there is an Imagemap used so the nodes may be linking to some Pages.

nucleus (Spdya) cell cycle (Spdya)
Anatomy Link Frequency
spinal cord 1
dorsal root ganglion 1
Spdya (Rattus norvegicus)
Pain Link Frequency Relevance Heat
opioid receptor 19 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
mu opioid receptor 9 99.84 Very High Very High Very High
Thermal hyperalgesia 2 99.42 Very High Very High Very High
Spinal cord 2 98.76 Very High Very High Very High
antagonist 8 98.62 Very High Very High Very High
narcan 27 98.58 Very High Very High Very High
Opioid 11 98.44 Very High Very High Very High
dorsal root ganglion 4 97.50 Very High Very High Very High
Morphine 21 97.48 Very High Very High Very High
action potential duration 1 96.92 Very High Very High Very High
Disease Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Hyperalgesia 3 99.42 Very High Very High Very High
Ganglion Cysts 4 97.50 Very High Very High Very High
Bordatella Infection 4 75.00 Quite High
Neuroblastoma 1 75.00 Quite High
Pain 2 5.00 Very Low Very Low Very Low
Opiate Addiction 1 5.00 Very Low Very Low Very Low
Syndrome 1 5.00 Very Low Very Low Very Low

Sentences Mentioned In

Key: Protein Mutation Event Anatomy Negation Speculation Pain term Disease term
These data suggest that the switch to Gs coupling by MOR in response to chronic morphine, which is attenuated by ultra-low-dose opioid antagonist cotreatment, leads to a two-pronged stimulation of adenylyl cyclase utilizing both Galpha and Gbetagamma subunits of the Gs protein novel to this receptor.
Positive_regulation (utilizing) of Gs protein associated with antagonist, mu opioid receptor, opioid and morphine
1) Confidence 0.10 Published 2006 Journal J. Neurobiol. Section Abstract Doc Link 16967511 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 1.16
Moreover, a co-immunoprecipitation study showed that ultra-low dose naloxone restored mu-opioid receptor/Gi-protein coupling and inhibited the PTX-induced mu-opioid receptor/Gs-protein coupling.
Positive_regulation (induced) of Gs-protein associated with narcan and opioid receptor
2) Confidence 0.10 Published 2009 Journal Neuroscience Section Abstract Doc Link 19682558 Disease Relevance 0.15 Pain Relevance 1.72
Four days after PTX injection, thermal hyperalgesia was observed, together with increased coupling of excitatory Gs-protein to mu-opioid receptors in the spinal cord.
Positive_regulation (increased) of Gs-protein in spinal cord associated with thermal hyperalgesia, mu opioid receptor and spinal cord
3) Confidence 0.09 Published 2009 Journal Neuroscience Section Abstract Doc Link 19682558 Disease Relevance 0.24 Pain Relevance 1.58
Prolongation of the action potential duration of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by low (nM) concentrations of opioids occurs through activation of excitatory opioid receptors that are positively coupled via Gs regulatory protein to adenylate cyclase.
Positive_regulation (coupled) of Gs regulatory protein in dorsal root ganglion associated with ganglion cysts, dorsal root ganglion, action potential duration, opioid receptor and opioid
4) Confidence 0.00 Published 1995 Journal J. Neurosci. Res. Section Abstract Doc Link 8568936 Disease Relevance 0.34 Pain Relevance 0.66

General Comments

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