INT66424

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Context Info
Confidence 0.32
First Reported 1996
Last Reported 2010
Negated 3
Speculated 3
Reported most in Body
Documents 7
Total Number 11
Disease Relevance 2.33
Pain Relevance 2.33

This is a graph with borders and nodes. Maybe there is an Imagemap used so the nodes may be linking to some Pages.

transmembrane transport (SLC43A3)
Anatomy Link Frequency
neuronal 1
SLC43A3 (Homo sapiens)
Pain Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Electroencephalography 81 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
cocaine 25 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
anesthesia 7 99.16 Very High Very High Very High
alcohol 39 96.00 Very High Very High Very High
positron emission tomography 5 95.08 Very High Very High Very High
cannabis 17 93.12 High High
Intracerebroventricular 2 93.12 High High
Raphe 9 85.84 High High
Pain 8 85.84 High High
Somatosensory cortex 2 84.48 Quite High
Disease Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Sepsis 60 99.82 Very High Very High Very High
Erectile Dysfunction 8 99.44 Very High Very High Very High
Reprotox - General 1 2 99.44 Very High Very High Very High
Drug Induced Neurotoxicity 30 89.68 High High
Pain 5 85.84 High High
Cognitive Disorder 23 85.76 High High
Unconsciousness 5 75.92 Quite High
Sleep Disorders 2 74.24 Quite High
Encephalopathy 46 68.28 Quite High
Heart Rate Under Development 2 66.68 Quite High

Sentences Mentioned In

Key: Protein Mutation Event Anatomy Negation Speculation Pain term Disease term
Time of recording with respect to the menstrual cycle was not controlled, as previous studies have demonstrated that the EEG variables under study are not sensitive to time during the cycle [72].
Neg (not) Regulation (sensitive) of EEG
1) Confidence 0.32 Published 2010 Journal BMC Med Genet Section Body Doc Link PMC2851592 Disease Relevance 0.15 Pain Relevance 0
According to the still prominent and robust neurophysiologic findings in Ecstasy users, the aim of the present study was to detect whether EEG activity is altered in an extended representative sample of former Ecstasy users.
Spec (whether) Regulation (altered) of EEG
2) Confidence 0.25 Published 2010 Journal PLoS ONE Section Body Doc Link PMC2990767 Disease Relevance 0.15 Pain Relevance 0.17
Whether the effects of cocaine on EEG activity and penile erection are mechanistically linked, however, remains to be fully elucidated.
Spec (Whether) Regulation (effects) of EEG associated with erectile dysfunction and cocaine
3) Confidence 0.23 Published 1996 Journal Synapse Section Abstract Doc Link 8923663 Disease Relevance 0.35 Pain Relevance 0.33
However, the same administration of cocaine in animals under pentobarbital sodium anesthesia (50 mg/kg, i.p.) failed to significantly affect EEG activity, despite an appreciable dose-dependent elevation in ICP.
Neg (failed) Regulation (affect) of EEG associated with anesthesia and cocaine
4) Confidence 0.23 Published 1996 Journal Synapse Section Abstract Doc Link 8923663 Disease Relevance 0.29 Pain Relevance 0.57
Pups aged 5-7 days exhibited no EEG response to clamping in view of their isoelectric traces.
Neg (no) Regulation (response) of EEG
5) Confidence 0.22 Published 2009 Journal Lab. Anim. Section Abstract Doc Link 19237459 Disease Relevance 0.14 Pain Relevance 0.21
Moreover, accounting for possible interactions with concurrent drugs ascertained the effect of Ecstasy on EEG spectral changes.
Regulation (effect) of EEG
6) Confidence 0.19 Published 2010 Journal PLoS ONE Section Body Doc Link PMC2990767 Disease Relevance 0.06 Pain Relevance 0.23
Thus, the clinical impact of these well reported altered EEG activities and our findings have to be considered with special interest.
Regulation (altered) of EEG
7) Confidence 0.11 Published 2010 Journal PLoS ONE Section Body Doc Link PMC2990767 Disease Relevance 0.16 Pain Relevance 0.24
The acquired electroencephalogram (EEG) data was analysed in four ways: (1) comparison of EEG topographic patterns and power spectra across baseline, CPT, and post-CPT; (2) dynamic EEG changes during CPT; (3) correlation of EEG activities at the isolated focal maxima across the three experimental stages; and (4) spatial correlation of EEG powers among the focal sites during CPT.
Regulation (changes) of EEG
8) Confidence 0.10 Published 2002 Journal Brain Res. Bull. Section Abstract Doc Link 11927371 Disease Relevance 0.17 Pain Relevance 0.17
In order to remedy this Bojak et al. (2004) used the full set of Liley et al. (2002) equations to model the effects of anaesthetics on the EEG.
Regulation (effects) of EEG associated with electroencephalography
9) Confidence 0.01 Published 2008 Journal Cogn Neurodyn Section Body Doc Link PMC2585619 Disease Relevance 0.13 Pain Relevance 0.28
Interestingly, both serotype and LPS concentration of the latter study were different to our experimental protocol, suggesting that the observed effects on EEG activity are independent from these factors.
Spec (observed) Regulation (effects) of EEG
10) Confidence 0.00 Published 2008 Journal J Neuroinflammation Section Body Doc Link PMC2553764 Disease Relevance 0.39 Pain Relevance 0
In order to correlate the observed sepsis-induced changes in CBF and EEG to brain glucose utilization, a marker of neuronal activity, we assessed cerebral glucose uptake by 18F-fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG-PET) using a small animal scanner.
Regulation (changes) of EEG in neuronal associated with positron emission tomography and sepsis
11) Confidence 0.00 Published 2008 Journal J Neuroinflammation Section Body Doc Link PMC2553764 Disease Relevance 0.35 Pain Relevance 0.14

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