INT88688

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Context Info
Confidence 0.26
First Reported 2000
Last Reported 2010
Negated 0
Speculated 0
Reported most in Body
Documents 33
Total Number 38
Disease Relevance 18.46
Pain Relevance 0.50

This is a graph with borders and nodes. Maybe there is an Imagemap used so the nodes may be linking to some Pages.

cytosol (HBE1) transport (HBE1)
Anatomy Link Frequency
liver 1
HBE1 (Homo sapiens)
Pain Link Frequency Relevance Heat
fibrosis 22 88.60 High High
Inflammation 44 88.12 High High
withdrawal 11 77.28 Quite High
Potency 76 69.16 Quite High
Pain 13 50.56 Quite High
tolerance 8 50.00 Quite Low
pruritus 5 45.80 Quite Low
headache 18 10.00 Low Low
Serotonin 2 6.24 Low Low
peripheral neuropathy 24 5.00 Very Low Very Low Very Low
Disease Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Hepatitis B Virus Infection 1382 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Hepatitis 479 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Chronic Hepatitis B 17 99.72 Very High Very High Very High
Chronic Hepatitis 343 99.32 Very High Very High Very High
Immunization 50 98.48 Very High Very High Very High
Infection 174 96.84 Very High Very High Very High
Stress 14 94.88 High High
Renal Failure 6 91.20 High High
Hepatocellular Cancer 65 90.20 High High
Disease 77 90.00 High High

Sentences Mentioned In

Key: Protein Mutation Event Anatomy Negation Speculation Pain term Disease term
However, HBA and HBB differences between S and NS foxes could only partly account for the observed decreased levels of HBE and HEBP1 in selected foxes.
Negative_regulation (decreased) of HBE
1) Confidence 0.26 Published 2007 Journal Behav Brain Funct Section Body Doc Link PMC1858698 Disease Relevance 0.19 Pain Relevance 0
The HB mRNA level was then included as an additional covariate in the original model, and thus the expression difference of HBE and HEBP1 was evaluated taking the maximum perfusion effect into account.


Negative_regulation (difference) of HBE
2) Confidence 0.26 Published 2007 Journal Behav Brain Funct Section Body Doc Link PMC1858698 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0
In a meta-analysis of 15 randomized, controlled trials, loss of HBeAg and HBV DNA in HBeAg positive patients is seen in 33% and 37% on conventional interferon alpha-treated patients compared with 12% and 17% of untreated patients, respectively (Wong et al 1993).
Negative_regulation (loss) of HBeAg associated with hepatitis b virus infection
3) Confidence 0.04 Published 2006 Journal International Journal of Nanomedicine Section Body Doc Link PMC2426802 Disease Relevance 0.88 Pain Relevance 0.04
The authors also found that a more profound HBeAg suppression at week 12 of therapy (less than 10 IU/mL) was associated with a higher HBeAg seroconversion (53%).
Negative_regulation (suppression) of HBeAg
4) Confidence 0.04 Published 2006 Journal International Journal of Nanomedicine Section Body Doc Link PMC2426802 Disease Relevance 0.30 Pain Relevance 0
Secondary endpoints included the proportion of subjects with HBV DNA < 5 log copies/mL and proportion undetectable at one year, normalization of ALT, HBeAg loss, HBeAg seroconversion and therapeutic response, as defined in the GLOBE trial.
Negative_regulation (loss) of HBeAg associated with hepatitis b virus infection
5) Confidence 0.04 Published 2009 Journal Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2762437 Disease Relevance 0.58 Pain Relevance 0
Similarly convincing clinical data in HBV are lacking, with de novo nucleoside (or nucleoside/nucleotide) combinations failing to show improved efficacy over monotherapy.24–26 In these studies, rates of HBeAg loss, HBeAg seroconversion, magnitude of HBV DNA suppression and proportion undetectable at one year have not differed among subjects randomized to dual therapy versus monotherapy.
Negative_regulation (loss) of HBeAg associated with hepatitis b virus infection
6) Confidence 0.04 Published 2009 Journal Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2762437 Disease Relevance 0.68 Pain Relevance 0.03
Given the similar rates of HBeAg loss and seroconversion with the agents available there, they felt there was not enough evidence to support recommending one drug over another when all other factors were also considered.
Negative_regulation (loss) of HBeAg
7) Confidence 0.04 Published 2009 Journal Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2762437 Disease Relevance 0.48 Pain Relevance 0
The efficacy of hepatitis B therapies are therefore measured by such surrogate endpoints as HBV DNA suppression, normalization of biochemical markers (alanine aminotransferase [ALT], aspartate aminotransferase [AST]), loss of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and seroconversion to hepatitis B e antibody (anti-HBe), and loss of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg).
Negative_regulation (loss) of HBeAg associated with hepatitis b virus infection and hepatitis
8) Confidence 0.04 Published 2009 Journal Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2762437 Disease Relevance 0.97 Pain Relevance 0.04
Secondary outcomes were histologic response, change in HBV DNA levels, HBeAg loss, HBsAg loss, HBeAg seroconversion, HBsAg seroconversion, and normalization of ALT.
Negative_regulation (loss) of HBeAg associated with hepatitis b virus infection
9) Confidence 0.04 Published 2009 Journal Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2762437 Disease Relevance 0.55 Pain Relevance 0
HBeAg-positive subjects in GLOBE were also offered the option of stopping study drug if HBeAg loss had been maintained for 24 weeks with an undetectable HBV DNA.
Negative_regulation (loss) of HBeAg associated with hepatitis b virus infection
10) Confidence 0.03 Published 2009 Journal Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2762437 Disease Relevance 0.35 Pain Relevance 0
The combined response (HBeAg loss, HBV DNA suppression < 500 000 copies/mL, ALT normalization) was higher in all pegylated interferon alpha-2a doses combined (24% vs 12%).
Negative_regulation (loss) of HBeAg associated with hepatitis b virus infection
11) Confidence 0.03 Published 2006 Journal International Journal of Nanomedicine Section Body Doc Link PMC2426802 Disease Relevance 0.26 Pain Relevance 0
However, the efficacy of conventional interferon alpha, defined as sustained loss of HBeAg and HBV DNA, is limited.
Negative_regulation (loss) of HBeAg associated with hepatitis b virus infection
12) Confidence 0.03 Published 2006 Journal International Journal of Nanomedicine Section Body Doc Link PMC2426802 Disease Relevance 0.82 Pain Relevance 0.04
In Caucasians, the long-term durability of HBeAg is as high as 90% (Niederau et al 1996), while around 20%–70% of patients with loss of HBeAg and hepatitis B e antibody (anti-HBe) seroconversion will eventually lose hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) (Niederau et al 1996; Lau et al 1997).
Negative_regulation (loss) of HBeAg associated with hepatitis
13) Confidence 0.03 Published 2006 Journal International Journal of Nanomedicine Section Body Doc Link PMC2426802 Disease Relevance 0.97 Pain Relevance 0.03
In a meta-analysis of 15 randomized, controlled trials, loss of HBeAg and HBV DNA in HBeAg positive patients is seen in 33% and 37% on conventional interferon alpha-treated patients compared with 12% and 17% of untreated patients, respectively (Wong et al 1993).
Negative_regulation (loss) of HBeAg associated with hepatitis b virus infection
14) Confidence 0.03 Published 2006 Journal International Journal of Nanomedicine Section Body Doc Link PMC2426802 Disease Relevance 0.89 Pain Relevance 0.04
There were no differences among the three groups with regard to ALT normalization, HBeAg loss, HBeAg seroconversion, or therapeutic response.
Negative_regulation (loss) of HBeAg
15) Confidence 0.03 Published 2009 Journal Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2762437 Disease Relevance 0.41 Pain Relevance 0
This concept grew, in part, from data in the GLOBE study of telbivudine that HBV DNA suppression at week 24 (or lack thereof) could predict HBeAg loss and seroconversion at week 104.59 In that study, among patients with HBV DNA > 4 log copies/mL at week 24 of telbivudine, HBeAg seroconversion was 10% at week 104 compared to 86% in those with undetectable HBV DNA at week 24.
Negative_regulation (loss) of HBeAg associated with hepatitis b virus infection
16) Confidence 0.03 Published 2009 Journal Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2762437 Disease Relevance 0.84 Pain Relevance 0
There were no differences among the three groups with regard to ALT normalization, HBeAg loss, HBeAg seroconversion, or therapeutic response.
Negative_regulation (loss) of HBeAg
17) Confidence 0.03 Published 2009 Journal Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2762437 Disease Relevance 0.41 Pain Relevance 0
All had maintained HBeAg loss, but only 93% maintained HBeAg seroconversion.
Negative_regulation (loss) of HBeAg
18) Confidence 0.03 Published 2009 Journal Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2762437 Disease Relevance 0.35 Pain Relevance 0
The investigators found no differences at week 52 between any of the groups with regard to reduction in HBV DNA, proportion of subjects with undetectable HBV DNA by PCR assay, biochemical response, HBeAg loss, or HBeAg seroconversion (Table 2).
Negative_regulation (loss) of HBeAg associated with hepatitis b virus infection
19) Confidence 0.03 Published 2009 Journal Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2762437 Disease Relevance 0.61 Pain Relevance 0.03
Of the 38 telbivudine patients who elected to do so, 82% sustained HBeAg loss through the last study visit after a median post-treatment follow up of 29.1 weeks.19
Negative_regulation (loss) of HBeAg
20) Confidence 0.02 Published 2009 Journal Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management Section Body Doc Link PMC2762437 Disease Relevance 0.44 Pain Relevance 0

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