INT46754

From wiki-pain
Revision as of 07:48, 21 September 2012 by Daniel (Talk | contribs)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search
Context Info
Confidence 0.78
First Reported 1982
Last Reported 2010
Negated 0
Speculated 0
Reported most in Body
Documents 7
Total Number 15
Disease Relevance 2.36
Pain Relevance 3.24

This is a graph with borders and nodes. Maybe there is an Imagemap used so the nodes may be linking to some Pages.

plasma membrane (F2r) signal transducer activity (F2r)
Anatomy Link Frequency
bladder 3
endothelial cells 2
nerve 1
primary somatosensory cortex 1
endothelium 1
F2r (Rattus norvegicus)
Pain Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Inflammation 198 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Enkephalin 13 99.44 Very High Very High Very High
primary somatosensory cortex 2 98.76 Very High Very High Very High
lidocaine 81 98.12 Very High Very High Very High
agonist 45 92.84 High High
substance P 18 91.36 High High
guanethidine 3 90.80 High High
qutenza 3 89.52 High High
Inflammatory stimuli 45 87.32 High High
Thalamus 2 80.72 Quite High
Disease Link Frequency Relevance Heat
INFLAMMATION 234 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Neurogenic Inflammation 9 93.36 High High
Cystitis 36 90.00 High High
Cancer 36 79.36 Quite High
Interstitial Cystitis 27 78.04 Quite High
Peripheral Arterial Disease 9 76.08 Quite High
Hypertension 1 71.84 Quite High
Apoptosis 9 66.96 Quite High
Overdose 9 20.16 Low Low
Pain 9 5.00 Very Low Very Low Very Low

Sentences Mentioned In

Key: Protein Mutation Event Anatomy Negation Speculation Pain term Disease term
We consider it a likely explanation that direct stimulation of MIF and PAR1 containing cells in the urothelium is involved in thrombin-stimulated MIF release in the rat bladder.
Localization (release) of thrombin-stimulated in bladder
1) Confidence 0.78 Published 2010 Journal PLoS ONE Section Body Doc Link PMC3013117 Disease Relevance 0.59 Pain Relevance 0.56
In a separate set of experiments, UROtsa cells were plated and incubated as above, growth medium removed and replaced with DMEM with 0.1% bovine serum albumin and were incubated for 1 hour at 37C and then exposed to thrombin (100 nM) for the following time intervals: 0, 15, 60, 90, 120, 180 min.
Localization (exposed) of thrombin
2) Confidence 0.73 Published 2010 Journal PLoS ONE Section Body Doc Link PMC3013117 Disease Relevance 0.08 Pain Relevance 0.04
For the effect of different concentrations of thrombin on UROtsa MIF release, a concentration-response curve was fitted using log-logistic regression with 4-point parameter estimation (using R [41] and the drc package [42] and the ED50 was calculated.
Localization (release) of thrombin
3) Confidence 0.73 Published 2010 Journal PLoS ONE Section Body Doc Link PMC3013117 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0
Cells were incubated for 1 hour at 37C and then exposed to thrombin at different concentrations (in sterile water; Sigma-Aldrich; St.
Localization (exposed) of thrombin
4) Confidence 0.73 Published 2010 Journal PLoS ONE Section Body Doc Link PMC3013117 Disease Relevance 0.06 Pain Relevance 0.03
Our results show that treatment with intraluminal thrombin elicited MIF release from the rat bladder (Fig. 3B).
Localization (release) of thrombin in bladder
5) Confidence 0.73 Published 2010 Journal PLoS ONE Section Body Doc Link PMC3013117 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.07
Our current results suggest that one component of PAR1-mediated bladder inflammation may be release of MIF from urothelial cells and MIF upregulation.
Localization (release) of PAR1 in bladder associated with inflammation
6) Confidence 0.73 Published 2010 Journal PLoS ONE Section Body Doc Link PMC3013117 Disease Relevance 1.22 Pain Relevance 0.69
Our results thus confirm earlier findings of thrombin-induced MIF release from human endothelial cells [17] and we extend those results by showing that the same phenomenon occurs in vivo.
Localization (release) of thrombin in endothelial cells
7) Confidence 0.68 Published 2010 Journal PLoS ONE Section Body Doc Link PMC3013117 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0
Therefore, thrombin-induced MIF release represents another mechanism to initiate MIF release from the urothelium, aside from nerve-mediated release which has already been described [27], [28].
Localization (release) of thrombin in nerve
8) Confidence 0.68 Published 2010 Journal PLoS ONE Section Body Doc Link PMC3013117 Disease Relevance 0.34 Pain Relevance 0.26
In rats, thrombin-induced MIF release was reduced but not abolished by intravesical lidocaine treatment.
Localization (release) of thrombin associated with lidocaine
9) Confidence 0.68 Published 2010 Journal PLoS ONE Section Abstract Doc Link PMC3013117 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.26
After neonatal sensory denervation there was a significant reduction in the thrombin-stimulated release of endothelin compared to the controls (0.012 +/ -0.012 (4) compared to 0.063 +/- 0.012 (6), pmol/cm2/24 h, p < 0.02).
Localization (release) of thrombin-stimulated
10) Confidence 0.65 Published 1996 Journal Experientia Section Abstract Doc Link 8631394 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.13
The long-term (trophic) influence of perivascular nerves on the endothelium was investigated by measuring changes in thrombin-stimulated release of the potent vasoconstrictor, endothelin, after selective chronic denervation.
Localization (release) of thrombin-stimulated in endothelium
11) Confidence 0.65 Published 1996 Journal Experientia Section Abstract Doc Link 8631394 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.13
Chronic sensory denervation reduces thrombin-stimulated endothelin release from aortic endothelial cells.
Localization (release) of thrombin-stimulated in endothelial cells
12) Confidence 0.57 Published 1996 Journal Experientia Section Title Doc Link 8631394 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.13
In this context, it is interesting that area DZ exhibits a high PC1 score despite its location within Par1.
Localization (location) of Par1
13) Confidence 0.40 Published 2008 Journal PLoS ONE Section Body Doc Link PMC2533703 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.04
For example, we found a subarea “Par1L” in the lateral region of the primary somatosensory cortex, which is not shown in the original map of Palomero-Gallagher and Zilles [8].
Localization (found) of Par1L in primary somatosensory cortex associated with primary somatosensory cortex
14) Confidence 0.33 Published 2008 Journal PLoS ONE Section Body Doc Link PMC2533703 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.05
In vitro, thrombin released platelet-met-enkephalin IR concomitantly with 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), suggesting a common subcellular localization, i.e. the 5-HT storing organelles, for met-enkephalin IR and the amine.
Localization (released) of thrombin in platelet associated with enkephalin
15) Confidence 0.08 Published 1982 Journal Life Sci. Section Abstract Doc Link 7098767 Disease Relevance 0.07 Pain Relevance 0.85

General Comments

This test has worked.

Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox