INT6214

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Context Info
Confidence 0.50
First Reported 1981
Last Reported 2010
Negated 0
Speculated 2
Reported most in Abstract
Documents 123
Total Number 128
Disease Relevance 26.39
Pain Relevance 89.57

This is a graph with borders and nodes. Maybe there is an Imagemap used so the nodes may be linking to some Pages.

nucleoplasm (Adarb1) mRNA processing (Adarb1) nucleolus (Adarb1)
RNA binding (Adarb1) nucleus (Adarb1) intracellular (Adarb1)
Anatomy Link Frequency
brain 9
spinal 7
spinal cord 5
neurons 5
dorsal horn 4
Adarb1 (Rattus norvegicus)
Pain Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Glutamate 645 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
nMDA receptor 514 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
antagonist 477 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
substance P 347 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Pain 304 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Spinal cord 243 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
gABA 219 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Opioid 121 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Dopamine 110 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Cholecystokinin 96 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Disease Link Frequency Relevance Heat
Pain 272 100.00 Very High Very High Very High
Spinal Cord Ischemia 3 99.98 Very High Very High Very High
Neuroblastoma 2 99.78 Very High Very High Very High
Nervous System Injury 45 99.68 Very High Very High Very High
Nociception 119 99.50 Very High Very High Very High
Ganglion Cysts 12 99.40 Very High Very High Very High
Increased Venous Pressure Under Development 7 99.40 Very High Very High Very High
Anxiety Disorder 19 99.38 Very High Very High Very High
Diabetes Mellitus 8 99.36 Very High Very High Very High
Stress 11 99.28 Very High Very High Very High

Sentences Mentioned In

Key: Protein Mutation Event Anatomy Negation Speculation Pain term Disease term
Fourteen days after dopaminergic denervation, receptor binding assays and quantitative in vitro autoradiography with highly selective radioligands demonstrated that the density of mu opioid receptors in the nucleus accumbens was decreased by 30 +/- 6%.
Negative_regulation (decreased) of receptors in nucleus accumbens associated with nucleus accumbens and mu opioid receptor
1) Confidence 0.50 Published 1989 Journal Brain Res. Section Abstract Doc Link 2558779 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.38
There was no change in delta or kappa receptors in the accumbens, a finding which indicates that the loss of mu opioid receptors was specific.
Negative_regulation (loss) of receptors associated with mu opioid receptor
2) Confidence 0.50 Published 1989 Journal Brain Res. Section Abstract Doc Link 2558779 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.44
A time course study demonstrated that the loss of mu receptors lagged behind the depletion of dopamine by about 5 days.
Negative_regulation (loss) of receptors associated with dopamine
3) Confidence 0.50 Published 1989 Journal Brain Res. Section Abstract Doc Link 2558779 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.48
Destruction of intrinsic neuronal cell bodies and dendrites by injection of ibotenic acid into the accumbens resulted in a loss of 36 +/- 3% of mu opioid receptors.
Negative_regulation (loss) of receptors in dendrites associated with mu opioid receptor
4) Confidence 0.50 Published 1989 Journal Brain Res. Section Abstract Doc Link 2558779 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.49
These results suggest that compounds activating and inhibiting GABA A receptors (muscimol, AOAA, bicuculline and picrotoxin) have a weak influence on clonidine induced analgesia as compared to the effect of baclofen (agonist of GABA B receptors).
Negative_regulation (inhibiting) of receptors associated with gaba, agonist, analgesia and clonidine
5) Confidence 0.50 Published 1994 Journal Pol J Pharmacol Section Abstract Doc Link 7894527 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 1.49
Time-related decreases in mu and delta opioid receptors in the superficial dorsal horn of the rat spinal cord following a large unilateral dorsal rhizotomy.
Negative_regulation (decreases) of receptors in dorsal horn associated with dorsal rhizotomy, dorsal horn, enkephalin, delta opioid receptors and spinal cord
6) Confidence 0.50 Published 1992 Journal Brain Res. Section Title Doc Link 1324759 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.66
A dose-dependent loss of vanilloid receptors (specific [3H]resiniferatoxin binding sites) was found in sensory ganglia of rats 24 h after s.c. administration of resiniferatoxin (RTX), an ultrapotent capsaicin analog.
Negative_regulation (loss) of receptors in ganglia associated with qutenza
7) Confidence 0.49 Published 1992 Journal Neurosci. Lett. Section Abstract Doc Link 1407700 Disease Relevance 0.14 Pain Relevance 0.19
In contrast, staining for mu opioid receptors using mu-selective antibodies revealed a discrete loss of mu opioid receptors localized ipsilateral to the nerve injury and specific for sections taken at the L6 level.
Negative_regulation (loss) of receptors in nerve associated with nervous system injury and mu opioid receptor
8) Confidence 0.45 Published 1998 Journal Brain Res. Section Abstract Doc Link 9622629 Disease Relevance 0.67 Pain Relevance 1.35
One possible explanation for this phenomenon is a generalized, multi-segmental loss of opioid mu (mu) receptors in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord after nerve injury.
Negative_regulation (loss) of receptors in nerve associated with nervous system injury, dorsal horn, opioid and spinal cord
9) Confidence 0.45 Published 1998 Journal Brain Res. Section Abstract Doc Link 9622629 Disease Relevance 0.74 Pain Relevance 1.05
The data indicate that the loss of mu opioid receptors are highly localized and may contribute to the loss of morphine activity involving input at these spinal segments (e.g., foot-flick response).
Negative_regulation (loss) of receptors in spinal associated with mu opioid receptor and morphine
10) Confidence 0.45 Published 1998 Journal Brain Res. Section Abstract Doc Link 9622629 Disease Relevance 0.51 Pain Relevance 1.19
On the other hand, the lack of a generalized loss of opioid mu receptors across spinal segments makes it unlikely that this is the primary cause for the loss of potency and efficacy of mu opioids to suppress multi-segmental reflexes, such as the tail-flick response.
Negative_regulation (loss) of receptors in spinal associated with tail-flick, opioid and potency
11) Confidence 0.45 Published 1998 Journal Brain Res. Section Abstract Doc Link 9622629 Disease Relevance 0.36 Pain Relevance 1.07
Co-injection of 6-OHDA and ibotenic acid decreased mu receptors by 41 +/- 4%, only slightly more than the loss caused by ibotenic acid alone.
Negative_regulation (decreased) of receptors
12) Confidence 0.37 Published 1989 Journal Brain Res. Section Abstract Doc Link 2558779 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.48
These results suggest that only a small number of mu opioid receptors in the nucleus accumbens are located on dopaminergic terminals and are consistent with the possibility that the loss of opioid receptors following denervation of dopaminergic fibers in the accumbens is the result of transsynaptic degeneration.
Negative_regulation (loss) of receptors in nucleus accumbens associated with nucleus accumbens, mu opioid receptor and opioid receptor
13) Confidence 0.37 Published 1989 Journal Brain Res. Section Abstract Doc Link 2558779 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.47
The compounds activating (muscimol, 1 mg/kg and aminooxyacetic acid; AOAA, 25 mg/kg) or inhibiting GABA-ergic receptors (bicuculline and picrotoxin, in subconvulsive doses 0.5-1 mg/kg) do not change clonidine-induced analgesia.
Negative_regulation (inhibiting) of receptors associated with gaba, analgesia and clonidine
14) Confidence 0.37 Published 1994 Journal Pol J Pharmacol Section Abstract Doc Link 7894527 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 1.37
Blockade of mu opioid receptors by i.c. injection decreased oral responsiveness to the nipple, while blockade of receptors by i.c.v. injection of CTOP increased oral responsiveness.
Negative_regulation (blockade) of receptors in nipple associated with mu opioid receptor
15) Confidence 0.37 Published 1998 Journal Physiol. Behav. Section Abstract Doc Link 9877428 Disease Relevance 0.18 Pain Relevance 0.24
Using specific ligands, namely [3H]DAMGO for mu sites and [3H]DTLET for delta sites, and a quantitative autoradiographic analysis, we have observed: (a) a decrease in binding on the ipsilateral side to the lesion as early as the first day postrhizotomy, the maximal loss being attained at 8 days postlesion, (b) after 8 days postlesion, the residual binding remains stable over the period of analysis (90 days), (c) the loss of mu receptors (71-74%) is significantly more pronounced than the loss of delta receptors (57-62%) and (d) affinities of postsynaptic mu and delta receptors are similar to those of the total receptor population in the superficial layers of the dorsal horn.
Negative_regulation (loss) of receptors in dorsal horn associated with dorsal horn
16) Confidence 0.37 Published 1992 Journal Brain Res. Section Abstract Doc Link 1324759 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.53
Using specific ligands, namely [3H]DAMGO for mu sites and [3H]DTLET for delta sites, and a quantitative autoradiographic analysis, we have observed: (a) a decrease in binding on the ipsilateral side to the lesion as early as the first day postrhizotomy, the maximal loss being attained at 8 days postlesion, (b) after 8 days postlesion, the residual binding remains stable over the period of analysis (90 days), (c) the loss of mu receptors (71-74%) is significantly more pronounced than the loss of delta receptors (57-62%) and (d) affinities of postsynaptic mu and delta receptors are similar to those of the total receptor population in the superficial layers of the dorsal horn.
Negative_regulation (loss) of receptors in dorsal horn associated with dorsal horn
17) Confidence 0.37 Published 1992 Journal Brain Res. Section Abstract Doc Link 1324759 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.54
Blockade of mu opioid receptors by i.c. injection decreased oral responsiveness to the nipple, while blockade of receptors by i.c.v. injection of CTOP increased oral responsiveness.
Negative_regulation (Blockade) of receptors in nipple associated with mu opioid receptor
18) Confidence 0.36 Published 1998 Journal Physiol. Behav. Section Abstract Doc Link 9877428 Disease Relevance 0.16 Pain Relevance 0.22
However, (-)-2 was not as selective as (-)-1 since it also reduced [3H]DADLE (delta) binding to 82.4 +/- 8.0% of the control value. (1S,2S)-trans-4-Isothiocyanato-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)- cyclohexyl]benzeneacetamide [(-)-3] exhibited selective wash-resistant inhibition of delta receptors labeled by [3H]DADLE resulting in a reduction in binding to 42.9 +/- 4.2% of control.
Negative_regulation (inhibition) of receptors
19) Confidence 0.34 Published 1990 Journal J. Med. Chem. Section Abstract Doc Link 2157008 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.04
However, (1S,2S)-trans-2-isothiocyanato-N-methyl-N-[2- (1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl]benzeneacetamide [(-)-1] was able to specifically and irreversibly inhibit kappa receptors labeled by [3H]-U69,593: Incubation of rat brain membranes for 60 min at 25 degrees C with 1 microM of (-)-1 resulted in a wash-resistant reduction of the binding to 11.2 +/- 2.5% of the control.
Negative_regulation (inhibit) of receptors in brain
20) Confidence 0.34 Published 1990 Journal J. Med. Chem. Section Abstract Doc Link 2157008 Disease Relevance 0 Pain Relevance 0.04

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